Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Obesity Research Advance Reported At The Jackson Laboratory

Date:
April 30, 1997
Source:
The Jackson Laboratory
Summary:
Unexpected results from an experiment at The Jackson Laboratory designed to probe the role of a protein implicated in human obesity will help researchers identify the complex thermogenic mechanisms that control regulation of body weight.

Related Articles







FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
APRIL 30, 1997


BAR HARBOR -- Unexpected results from an experiment at The Jackson Laboratory designed to probe the role of a protein implicated in human obesity will help researchers identify the complex thermogenic mechanisms that control regulation of body weight.


The results are reported in the May 1 issue of the British journal Nature by Leslie P. Kozak, Senior Staff Scientist at The Jackson Laboratory, and his colleagues. Title of the report is "Mice lacking mitochondrial uncoupling protein are cold-sensitive but not obese."


Co-authors include Elizabeth M. Simpson and Carmen Guerra, both of The Jackson Laboratory; Mary-Ellen Harper, University of Ottawa; and former Jackson Lab researchers Sven Enerback (University of Goteborg, Sweden), Anders Jacobsson (Stockholm University, Sweden), and Hitoshi Yamashita (National Defense Medical College, Japan).


The scientists built on research conducted at the Laboratory by Dr. Kozak into the mitochondrial uncoupling protein (UCP1). The only known function of UCP1 in mice is the production of heat by "nonshivering" thermogenesis in so-called brown fat. Several species of mammals, including humans, have an abundance of brown fat as newborns to protect them from cold before their body mass and metabolic systems are fully developed.


To further investigate the role of UCP1 in energy balance, Dr. Kozak and his colleagues specifically inactivated the UCP1 gene in their transgenic mouse model. A previous experiment in which UCP1 was overexpressed in brown fat had yielded the expected result of reduced obesity. Now, the scientists fully expected to observe in the UCP-deficient mouse an increase in obesity and/or overeating behavior.


Instead, the experiment reported in Nature showed a "striking resistance" to obesity and overeating in the UCP-deficient mice. However, the mice were very sensitive to cold, indicating a defect in thermoregulation.


"What we've identified is an important pathway for the regulation of body temperature, but surprisingly it's not directly associated with mechanisms controlling body weight," said Dr. Kozak. "It suggests that there must be other mechanisms that are able to compensate for UCP1 loss, and underscores the complexity of body weight regulation."


One candidate is UCP2, a recently described homologue of UCP1 that is broadly expressed in different mouse tissues, including brown fat. The discovery of UCP2 has generated enormous interest in the obesity field because it could provide a mechanism for reducing obesity by stimulating thermogenesis in a number of target tissues.


Dr. Kozak and his colleagues have initiated experiments to construct mouse models in which the UCP2 gene is overexpressed in brown fat or inactivated in the absence of UCP1 expression, to determine whether UCP2 is indeed a thermogenic protein. These transgenic mice will enable the team to rigorously determine the role of UCP2 in energy expenditure and obesity.



Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by The Jackson Laboratory. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

The Jackson Laboratory. "Obesity Research Advance Reported At The Jackson Laboratory." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 April 1997. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1997/04/970430164331.htm>.
The Jackson Laboratory. (1997, April 30). Obesity Research Advance Reported At The Jackson Laboratory. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1997/04/970430164331.htm
The Jackson Laboratory. "Obesity Research Advance Reported At The Jackson Laboratory." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1997/04/970430164331.htm (accessed October 25, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Texas Nurse Nina Pham Cured of Ebola

Texas Nurse Nina Pham Cured of Ebola

AFP (Oct. 25, 2014) — An American nurse who contracted Ebola while caring for a Liberian patient in Texas has been declared free of the virus and will leave the hospital. Duration: 01:01 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

Buzz60 (Oct. 24, 2014) — IKEA is out with a new convertible desk that can convert from a sitting desk to a standing one with just the push of a button. Jen Markham explains. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

AFP (Oct. 24, 2014) — A factory in China is busy making Ebola protective suits for healthcare workers and others fighting the spread of the virus. Duration: 00:38 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
WHO: Millions of Ebola Vaccine Doses by 2015

WHO: Millions of Ebola Vaccine Doses by 2015

AP (Oct. 24, 2014) — The World Health Organization said on Friday that millions of doses of two experimental Ebola vaccines could be ready for use in 2015 and five more experimental vaccines would start being tested in March. (Oct. 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins