Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Chemical In Oyster Shells May Help Clean Oil Spills

Date:
June 19, 1998
Source:
Clemson University
Summary:
An absorbent chemical in oyster shells could help clean up oil spills or even keep diapers dryer, according to a study by Clemson University scientists.

CLEMSON -- An absorbent chemical in oyster shells could help clean up oil spills or even keep diapers dryer, according to a study by Clemson University scientists.

A.P. "Hap" Wheeler, a biological sciences professor at Clemson University, said that amino acids in the shells form gels that can absorb 80-100 times their weight in water. By analyzing the chemical structure, he and university co-workers created new polymers that are attracting industry attention because they could help clean oil spills, speed water treatment or even be used to make diapers dryer.

The National Sea Grant featured the Clemson study, along with others, at a conference in New York this week. Conference organizers hope biotech companies will look to the sea for new breakthroughs in medicine and bioengineered products.

Proteins derived from oyster shells can also inhibit the growth of minerals, making them ideal water-treatment additives in boilers, cooling towers and mining and off-shore oil-drilling operations. Proteins may also be used in laundry detergents because they can be designed to bond with soil particles, suspending them so the soil is not deposited back on clean laundry.

Illinois-based Donlar Corp., which works extensively with Wheeler, has also introduced the compound for use in agriculture. The polymer enhances plants -- uptake of nutrients from the soil, which could allow farmers to use less fertizer -- subsequently saving them money and protecting the environment.

Wheeler and Donlar Corp.'s work with the degradable polymer won them the Environmental Protection Agency's Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Clemson University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Clemson University. "Chemical In Oyster Shells May Help Clean Oil Spills." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 June 1998. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/06/980619073435.htm>.
Clemson University. (1998, June 19). Chemical In Oyster Shells May Help Clean Oil Spills. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/06/980619073435.htm
Clemson University. "Chemical In Oyster Shells May Help Clean Oil Spills." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/06/980619073435.htm (accessed October 21, 2014).

Share This



More Earth & Climate News

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Traditional Farming Methods Gaining Ground in Mali

Traditional Farming Methods Gaining Ground in Mali

AFP (Oct. 20, 2014) He is leading a one man agricultural revolution in Mali - Oumar Diatabe uses traditional farming methods to get the most out of his land and is teaching others across the country how to do the same. Duration: 01:44 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Hey, Doc! Sewage, Beer and Food Scraps Can Power Chevrolet’s Bi-Fuel Impala

Hey, Doc! Sewage, Beer and Food Scraps Can Power Chevrolet’s Bi-Fuel Impala

3BL Media (Oct. 20, 2014) Hey, Doc! Sewage, Beer and Food Scraps Can Power Chevrolet’s Bi-fuel Impala Video provided by 3BL
Powered by NewsLook.com
White Rhino's Death In Kenya Means Just 6 Are Left

White Rhino's Death In Kenya Means Just 6 Are Left

Newsy (Oct. 20, 2014) Suni, a rare northern white rhino at Ol Pejeta Conservancy, died Friday. This, as many media have pointed out, leaves people fearing extinction. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
New Organic Fertilizer Helps Reforestation of Monarch Butterflies’ Winter Retreat

New Organic Fertilizer Helps Reforestation of Monarch Butterflies’ Winter Retreat

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 20, 2014) Using an organic fertiliser, a conservationist from the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), leads an award-winning project to reforest the sanctuary of monarch butterflies. Sharon Reich reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins