Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Geologic "X-Rays" Pinpoint Weak Spots On Volcano Surface

Date:
October 30, 1998
Source:
University At Buffalo
Summary:
By analyzing data collected by satellites circling the globe, volcanologists at the University at Buffalo have produced geologic "X-rays" that can pinpoint potentially dangerous weak spots on the surface of a volcano.

TORONTO -- By analyzing data collected by satellites circling the globe, volcanologists at the University at Buffalo have produced geologic "X-rays" that can pinpoint potentially dangerous weak spots on the surface of a volcano.

Related Articles


They reported here today (Oct. 29, 1998) at the annual meeting of the Geologic Society of America that they have used such data to produce a volcanic-hazards map for Citlalpetl, an active volcano about 80 miles west of Vera Cruz, Mexico.

Much the way an X-ray allows a physician to view a patient's bones and internal organs, hyperspectral data collected by satellites has allowed Michael Sheridan, Ph.D., chair and professor of the UB Department of Geology, and UB graduate student Bernard Hubbard to remotely "see" what's happening to minerals beneath the volcano's surface.

The hyperspectral data can be interpreted to determine properties such as the presence of water or iron-bearing minerals and clay on the volcanic surface, all of which can contribute to a weakening of the volcanic structure.

"We get back enormous amounts of data that provide us with something like the fingerprint of a volcanic surface," Sheridan explained.

Their preliminary results on Citlalpetl confirm their hypothesis that large amounts of certain materials on a volcano's surface represent soft spots that could easily trigger avalanches.

This is the first time that remote detection of these materials has been used in cooperation with public-safety officials to develop a volcanic-hazards map.

"We know how to estimate where avalanches end," said Sheridan. "This analysis can help us determine where they start."

In combination with fieldwork, such data will help the UB researchers develop a probability curve of the frequency for different catastrophic events resulting from volcanoes, such as landslides and avalanches, that could be used for hazard mitigation by public officials.

The project is funded by a $300,000 grant from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University At Buffalo. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University At Buffalo. "Geologic "X-Rays" Pinpoint Weak Spots On Volcano Surface." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 October 1998. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/10/981030082246.htm>.
University At Buffalo. (1998, October 30). Geologic "X-Rays" Pinpoint Weak Spots On Volcano Surface. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 29, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/10/981030082246.htm
University At Buffalo. "Geologic "X-Rays" Pinpoint Weak Spots On Volcano Surface." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/10/981030082246.htm (accessed March 29, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Earth & Climate News

Sunday, March 29, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Antarctic Ice Is Melting Faster Than Ever

Antarctic Ice Is Melting Faster Than Ever

Newsy (Mar. 27, 2015) — A new study of nearly two decades of satellite data shows Antarctic ice shelves are losing more mass faster every year. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Homes Near Landslide in Washington

Raw: Homes Near Landslide in Washington

AP (Mar. 27, 2015) — Aerial footage from KOMO shows several homes near a landslide in Washington. KOMO reports that at least one of the homes has been damaged. (March 27) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Clean-Up Follows Deadly Weather in Okla.

Clean-Up Follows Deadly Weather in Okla.

AP (Mar. 26, 2015) — Gov. Mary Fallin has declared a state of emergency for 25 Oklahoma counties after powerful storms rumbled across the state causing one death, numerous injuries and widespread damage. (March 26) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
At Least Four Dead After Floods in Northern Chile

At Least Four Dead After Floods in Northern Chile

Reuters - News Video Online (Mar. 26, 2015) — At least four people have been killed by severe flooding in northern Chile after rains battered the Andes mountains and swept into communities below. Rob Muir reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins