Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Abrasives To Zirconium... Growth In U.S. Economy Spurs Increased Mineral Consumption, Says Usgs Report

Date:
April 2, 1999
Source:
U.S. Geological Survey
Summary:
The U.S. economy expanded 3.9 percent in 1998, prompting increased consumption of minerals and mineral-based products, according to a new report of the U.S. Geological Survey. "Mineral Commodity Summaries 1999" provides government statistics on 1998 events, trends, and issues in the domestic and international mineral industries. Much of this increase in consumption, however, occurred because of increased imports of mineral-based products, especially steel and other metals, according to the report.

The U.S. economy expanded 3.9 percent in 1998, prompting increased consumption of minerals and mineral-based products, according to a new report of the U.S. Geological Survey. "Mineral Commodity Summaries 1999" provides government statistics on 1998 events, trends, and issues in the domestic and international mineral industries. Much of this increase in consumption, however, occurred because of increased imports of mineral-based products, especially steel and other metals, according to the report.

Related Articles


The consumption of minerals and mineral-based products affects all Americans because it reflects use of nonfuel minerals such as fertilizers in agriculture, concrete and building materials in construction, aggregate in road building, steel to make cars and all manner of transportation vehicles, and materials crucial to the communications industry.

"Summary reports such as this provide valuable insights into our country's use of its natural resources," said USGS Director Charles G. Groat. "They also give us more information on our reliance on imported raw materials and help decision makers in government and industry plan wisely for the future."

According to Mineral Commodity Summaries 1999:

The value of U.S. raw nonfuel minerals production was $40.1 billion in 1998, down slightly from the $40.5 billion produced in 1997. The value of domestic minerals production, however, has increased in 31 of the past 38 years. The top three states for production were Nevada ($3.1 billion), California ($3.0 billion), and Arizona ($2.8 billion).

Imports of processed mineral materials were valued at an estimated $60 billion, and exports were valued at an estimated $35 billion. Imports of metal ores and concentrates and raw industrial minerals increased slightly to $3 billion. Exports of raw minerals remained essentially unchanged at about $3 billion.

The outlook for the domestic minerals industry in 1999 will depend largely on two sectors of the U.S. economy that are significant consumers of aluminum, cement, copper, crushed stone, glass, sand and gravel, and steel. The automobile industry will be the primary source for the demand for metals, while highways and mass transit, budgeted for increased Federal spending, and other construction will be the primary source for the demand for industrial minerals.

On the international scene, the financial turmoil of countries in East Asia and Southeast Asia that began in 1997 continued in 1998. The prices of base metals, such as copper and nickel, fell to the lowest levels in 10 to 12 years. The prices of precious metals, such as gold and platinum, remained sluggish throughout 1998. The increased production of petroleum and the consequent decrease in price affected the economies of various major producers.

The report "Mineral Commodity Summaries 1999" is available for purchase from the Superintendent of Documents, P.O. Box 371954, Pittsburgh, PA 15250-7954. The stock number is 024-004-02461-5; price is $17.00 for U.S. delivery and $21.00 for delivery outside the United States. The publication is also available on a CD-ROM for $14.00 for U.S. delivery and $21.00 for delivery outside the United States. Order the Minerals and Materials Information February 1999 CD-ROM, stock number 024-004-02459-3. Individual two-page summaries are available through MINES FaxBack (703-648-4999) and are on the World Wide Web at http://minerals.er.usgs.gov/minerals/

As the Nation's largest water, earth, and biological science and civilian mapping agency, the USGS works in cooperation with more than 2000 organizations across the country to provide reliable, impartial, scientific information to resource managers, planners, and other customers. This information is gathered in every State by USGS scientists to minimize the loss of life and property from natural disasters, to contribute to the conservation and the sound economic and physical development of the nation's natural resources, and to enhance the quality of life by monitoring water, biological, energy, and mineral resources.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by U.S. Geological Survey. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

U.S. Geological Survey. "Abrasives To Zirconium... Growth In U.S. Economy Spurs Increased Mineral Consumption, Says Usgs Report." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 April 1999. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/04/990402074037.htm>.
U.S. Geological Survey. (1999, April 2). Abrasives To Zirconium... Growth In U.S. Economy Spurs Increased Mineral Consumption, Says Usgs Report. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/04/990402074037.htm
U.S. Geological Survey. "Abrasives To Zirconium... Growth In U.S. Economy Spurs Increased Mineral Consumption, Says Usgs Report." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/04/990402074037.htm (accessed December 20, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Earth & Climate News

Saturday, December 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Raw: Lava on Track to Hit Hawaii Market

Raw: Lava on Track to Hit Hawaii Market

AP (Dec. 19, 2014) Lava from an active volcano on Hawaii's Big Island slowed slightly but stayed on track to hit a shopping center in the small town of Pahoa. (Dec. 19) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Birds Might Be Better Meteorologists Than Us

Birds Might Be Better Meteorologists Than Us

Newsy (Dec. 19, 2014) A new study suggests a certain type of bird was able to sense a tornado outbreak that moved through the U.S. a day before it hit. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Navy Unveils Robot Fish

Navy Unveils Robot Fish

Reuters - Light News Video Online (Dec. 18, 2014) The U.S. Navy unveils an underwater device that mimics the movement of a fish. Tara Cleary reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Arctic Warming Twice As Fast As Rest Of Planet

Arctic Warming Twice As Fast As Rest Of Planet

Newsy (Dec. 18, 2014) The Arctic is warming twice as fast as the rest of the planet, thanks in part to something called feedback. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins