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State-Of-The-Art Tools Used To Identify Water-Bearing Bedrock Aquifers

Date:
May 4, 1999
Source:
U.s. Geological Survey
Summary:
State-of-the-art tools, such as radar and video cameras and other techniques, were used to describe fractured bedrock aquifers and determine the direction of water flowing in rocks underlying Seabrook and Rye, New Hampshire.

State-of-the-art tools, such as radar and video cameras and other techniques, were used to describe fractured bedrock aquifers and determine the direction of water flowing in rocks underlying Seabrook and Rye, New Hampshire. The advanced methods and tools that were used are highlighted in recently published reports by the U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

As bedrock aquifers generally yield small quantities of water to wells compared to sand and gravel aquifers, information on the primary direction water flowing to wells is needed to identify and protect this water resource. Bedrock wells in the towns of Seabrook and Rye were selected for the investigations because of the high yields of water from the wells and the geology of the area.

"Many towns and communities in New Hampshire have limited amounts or an absence of sand and gravel aquifers, forcing towns to look for additional water resources in bedrock," said Carole Johnson and Thomas Mack, hydrologists and authorνs of the reports."Knowing the characteristics of the rock in areas with high-yield wells could be useful to town and state agencies in locating other high-yield wells in areas of similar geology, and identify areas of the aquifer that needs protection," says Johnson and Mack.

Copies of the reports Open-File Report 98-558, titled "Borehole-geophysical characterization of a fractured-bedrock aquifer, Rye, New Hampshire," by Carole D. Johnson and others; and Open-File Report 98-176, titled "Geophysical characterization of a high-yield, fractured-bedrock well, Seabrook, New Hampshire," Thomas J. Mack and others, are available for viewing at university, state, and government depository libraries and from the USGS, NH/VT District office, 361 Commerce Way, Pembroke, NH 03275, (603) 226-7837.

As the nation's largest water, earth and biological science, and civilian mapping agency, the USGS works in cooperation with more than 2,000 organizations across the country to provide reliable, impartial, scientific information to resource managers, planners, and other customers. This information is gathered in every state by USGS scientists to minimize the loss of life and property from natural disasters, contribute to the sound conservation, economic and physical development of the nation's natural resources, and enhance the quality of life by monitoring water, biological, energy, and mineral resources.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by U.s. Geological Survey. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

U.s. Geological Survey. "State-Of-The-Art Tools Used To Identify Water-Bearing Bedrock Aquifers." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 May 1999. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/05/990504070741.htm>.
U.s. Geological Survey. (1999, May 4). State-Of-The-Art Tools Used To Identify Water-Bearing Bedrock Aquifers. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/05/990504070741.htm
U.s. Geological Survey. "State-Of-The-Art Tools Used To Identify Water-Bearing Bedrock Aquifers." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/05/990504070741.htm (accessed August 29, 2014).

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