Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Raise Eggs' Vitamin D3 Content Sevenfold By Adding More Vitamin D To Chicken Feed

Date:
October 15, 1999
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
The vitamin D3 content of eggs can be raised sevenfold by tripling the vitamin D in chicken feed, according to a study by Finnish scientists published in the Oct. 18 issue of the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, a peer-reviewed publication of the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society.

An egg a day produced this way could provide recommended daily amount of vitamin D

Related Articles


Washington, D.C. -- The vitamin D3 content of eggs can be raised sevenfold by tripling the vitamin D in chicken feed, according to a study by Finnish scientists published in the Oct. 18 issue of the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, a peer-reviewed publication of the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society.

"We found that the daily eating of one egg produced this way will provide the daily recommended amount of vitamin D. Given the importance of vitamin D to human health and the difficulties some people have in getting it into their diets, the possibility of producing vitamin D-enriched eggs is worthy of consideration," said Pirjo Mattila, Ph.D., senior researcher at the Agricultural Research Centre of Finland and the study's principal investigator.

Vitamin D is crucial for normal bone formation and may help prevent postmenopausal osteoporosis. People synthesize vitamin D in their skin with the help of sunlight, but inhabitants of northern countries, where sunlight can be scarce during much of the year, need to eat foods rich in vitamin D or take supplements. Foods rich in vitamin D include fish, some wild mushrooms, and egg yolks. Milk, liver, and some meats contain lower levels of vitamin D. Eggs are interesting to consider as a vitamin D source because in addition to vitamin D3, they contain significant levels of the more active hydroxylated metabolite, 25-hydroxy-vitamin D3.

"We believe our study is the first to systematically follow vitamin D concentrations and metabolism in eggs as these factors are affected by feed with different vitamin D levels," said Mattila.

The work was done on 54 hens over six weeks, 90 percent of them in laying mode at the study's beginning and all them 30 weeks old. They were divided into three groups, with each group receiving different levels of vitamin D3 in their feed. All of the hens ate a standard feed mixture containing 2,496 IU of vitamin D3 per kilogram for a one-week balancing period prior to the study's commencement.

Hens that ate feed containing less vitamin D than present in the balancing period feed amounts produced eggs with decreased vitamin D levels (as compared to common store-bought eggs) in the yolks. Hens that ate feed containing the same amount of vitamin D as was present in the balancing period feed produced eggs that contained the same amount of vitamin D as found in store-bought eggs. The hens that consumed feed containing 3.5 times the vitamin D as found in the balancing period feed produced eggs that contained seven times the vitamin D3 and 1.5 times the vitamin D3 metabolite found in store-bought eggs.

Mattila's study colleagues were Professors Vieno Piironen and Kaisa Lehikoinen of the University of Helsinki's applied chemistry and microbiology department and Professor Tuomo Kiiskinen of the Agricultural Research Centre of Finland.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Raise Eggs' Vitamin D3 Content Sevenfold By Adding More Vitamin D To Chicken Feed." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 October 1999. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/10/991015075146.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (1999, October 15). Raise Eggs' Vitamin D3 Content Sevenfold By Adding More Vitamin D To Chicken Feed. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 26, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/10/991015075146.htm
American Chemical Society. "Raise Eggs' Vitamin D3 Content Sevenfold By Adding More Vitamin D To Chicken Feed." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/10/991015075146.htm (accessed March 26, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, March 26, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

House Ready to Pass Medicare Doc Bill

House Ready to Pass Medicare Doc Bill

AP (Mar. 26, 2015) In rare bipartisan harmony, congressional leaders pushed a $214 billion bill permanently blocking physician Medicare cuts toward House passage Thursday, moving lawmakers closer to resolving a problem that has plagued them for years. (March 26) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
HIV Outbreak Prompts Public Health Emergency In Indiana

HIV Outbreak Prompts Public Health Emergency In Indiana

Newsy (Mar. 26, 2015) Indiana Gov. Mike Pence says he will bring additional state resources to help stop the epidemic. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
AAA: Distracted Driving a Serious Teen Problem

AAA: Distracted Driving a Serious Teen Problem

AP (Mar. 25, 2015) While distracted driving is not a new problem for teens, new research from the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety says it&apos;s much more serious than previously thought. (March 25) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Obama: Affordable Care Act 'saving Lives'

Obama: Affordable Care Act 'saving Lives'

AP (Mar. 25, 2015) Speaking at a White House event marking the fifth anniversary of the Affordable Care Act, President Barack Obama says the law is "saving lives that touch all of us." (March 25) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins