Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Scientists Map Biological Changes In Earth's Tropical Forests

Date:
February 26, 2001
Source:
University Of Toronto
Summary:
International tropical forest researchers at the Centre for Tropical Forest Sciences (CTFS) have established a world network of tropical forest plots to map changes in the biology of one-tenth of the Earth's rainforest tree species- one centimetre at a time.

Feb. 22, 2001 -- International tropical forest researchers at the Centre for Tropical Forest Sciences (CTFS) including Sean Thomas, forestry professor at U of T, have established a world network of tropical forest plots to map changes in the biology of one-tenth of the Earth's rainforest tree species- one centimetre at a time.

Related Articles


"We are now able to measure biological changes by using the same model whether they are occurring in Africa, Southeast Asia or in the Amazon," says Thomas, one of the program's research associates. For the past 20 years, international researchers have identified and tagged approximately three million trees and 6,500 species as small as one centimetre wide and monitored their rate of growth, change and decline in parts of Latin America, Southeast Asia and Africa.

"Data from these forest plots can be used to monitor the effects of pollution on tropical forests, measure the amount of carbon dioxide being absorbed by rainforests and provide a reference for scientists in search of particular medicinal plants," Thomas says. Dozens of new tree species have also been discovered through the detailed process of identifying almost every plant species on the plots.

Thomas started collaborating with CTFS in 1989 when he travelled to Southeast Asia to study tree species at the Pasoh Forest Reserve in Malaysia. Working with CTFS/Harvard University and the Japanese National Institute of Environmental Studies, Thomas and other researchers identified more than 800 tree species on the site. He is currently examining the growth and mortality rates of African mahogany trees on a site in the Democratic Republic of Congo with Jean-Remy Makana, a U of T PhD research assistant.

The report was published in the Jan. 26 issue of Science. Visit http://www.ctfs.si.edu for more information on the CFTS forest plots program.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Toronto. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Toronto. "Scientists Map Biological Changes In Earth's Tropical Forests." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 February 2001. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/02/010226070313.htm>.
University Of Toronto. (2001, February 26). Scientists Map Biological Changes In Earth's Tropical Forests. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 25, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/02/010226070313.htm
University Of Toronto. "Scientists Map Biological Changes In Earth's Tropical Forests." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/02/010226070313.htm (accessed January 25, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Plants & Animals News

Sunday, January 25, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Florida Might Legalize Black Bear Hunting

Florida Might Legalize Black Bear Hunting

Newsy (Jan. 24, 2015) A string of black bear attacks has Florida officials considering lifting the ban on hunting the animals to control their population. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Killing Large Portion Of Ape Population

Ebola Killing Large Portion Of Ape Population

Newsy (Jan. 23, 2015) Experts estimate Ebola has wiped out one-third of the world&apos;s gorillas and chimpanzees. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Controversy Shrouds Captive Killer Whale in Miami

Controversy Shrouds Captive Killer Whale in Miami

Reuters - Light News Video Online (Jan. 23, 2015) Activists hope the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency (NOAA) will label killer whales endangered, allowing lawyers to sue a Miami aquarium to release an orca into the wild after 44 years. Jillian Kitchener reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
‘Healthy’ Foods That Surprisingly Pack on Pounds

‘Healthy’ Foods That Surprisingly Pack on Pounds

Buzz60 (Jan. 23, 2015) Some &apos;healthy&apos; foods are actually fattening. Fitness and nutrition expert John Basedow (@JohnBasedow) shines a light on the sneaky foods like nuts, seeds, granola, trail mix, avocados, guacamole, olive oil, peanut butter, fruit juices and salads that are good for you...but not so much for your waistline. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins