Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Research Shows Climate Change Could Push Bats Northward

Date:
July 24, 2002
Source:
University Of Alberta
Summary:
Traditionally, biological research into the effects of climate change has focussed on the changes that have already occurred. What's really necessary, however, is a method to anticipate the effects that climate change will have in the future. A University of Alberta researcher is part of a team that has developed one tool to do just that.

Traditionally, biological research into the effects of climate change has focussed on the changes that have already occurred.

Related Articles


What's really necessary, however, is a method to anticipate the effects that climate change will have in the future. A University of Alberta researcher is part of a team that has developed one tool to do just that.

Biologist Murray Humphries, of the University of Alberta and the University of Aberdeen, co-authored a paper with Profs. John Speakman and Donald Thomas that appears in the most recent issue of Nature magazine. Their research predicts that climate change will cause the northern limit of the winter range of the North American little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus) to extend northward by approximately 5 km per year over the next century.

First, the researchers established a direct link between the hibernation physiology of the bats and their habitat distribution in northern regions.

In short, little brown bats can only hibernate in regions where winters are sufficiently short and warm to allow autumn fat reserves to last until spring.

Once that link was established, they used existing climate change projections for northern Canada to estimate how the hibernation conditions faced by bats will change in the future.

Comparing the two sets of information, they predicted that as North American winters get warmer and shorter, bats' existing capabilities to store fat for hibernation will allow them to expand their northern ranges by approximately 5 kilometres per year.

Researchers often face difficulties predicting the effects of climate change because of the sheer complexity of factors involved.

This research shows that, for at least one component of an ecosystem, basic physiological processes can be used to predict the effects of climate change.

Furthermore, this research also makes clear how even small changes in temperature can have dramatic changes on animal distributions.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Alberta. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Alberta. "Research Shows Climate Change Could Push Bats Northward." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 July 2002. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/07/020724080315.htm>.
University Of Alberta. (2002, July 24). Research Shows Climate Change Could Push Bats Northward. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 30, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/07/020724080315.htm
University Of Alberta. "Research Shows Climate Change Could Push Bats Northward." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/07/020724080315.htm (accessed January 30, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Earth & Climate News

Friday, January 30, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Raw: Rare Clouds Fill Grand Canyon

Raw: Rare Clouds Fill Grand Canyon

AP (Jan. 29, 2015) For the second time in two months, a rare weather phenomenon filled the Grand Canyon with thick clouds just below the rim on Wednesday. (Jan. 29) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Senate Passes Bill for Keystone XL Pipeline

Senate Passes Bill for Keystone XL Pipeline

AP (Jan. 29, 2015) The Republican-controlled Senate has passed a bipartisan bill approving construction of the Keystone XL oil pipeline. (Jan. 29) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
"Cloud Inversion" In Grand Canyon

"Cloud Inversion" In Grand Canyon

Reuters - US Online Video (Jan. 29, 2015) Time lapse video captures a blanket of clouds amassing in the Grand Canyon -- the result of a rare meteorological process called "cloud inversion." Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Why Researchers Say We Should Cut Back On Biofuels

Why Researchers Say We Should Cut Back On Biofuels

Newsy (Jan. 29, 2015) Biofuels aren&apos;t the best alternative to fossil fuels, according to a new report. In fact, they&apos;re quite a bad one. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins