Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Drop Of White The Right Stuff For Vines

Date:
September 12, 2002
Source:
Adelaide University
Summary:
MILK and other dairy products can be as effective as some conventional fungicides in controlling powdery mildew in vineyards, according to new research by the University of Adelaide in Australia.

MILK and other dairy products can be as effective as some conventional fungicides in controlling powdery mildew in vineyards, according to new research by the University of Adelaide in Australia.

Related Articles


Peter Crisp from the University's Department of Applied and Molecular Ecology is examining novel control methods for powdery mildew for his PhD, and has already attracted interest from the wine industry with his preliminary findings. Powdery mildew is a disease which attacks grapevine leaves and fruit, and currently costs the Australian wine industry about $30 million a year, mainly in control measures.

"A lot of people are already using milk on their household potplants to make the leaves shiny - but now its benefits are being formally recognised," Mr Crisp says. "For the first part of my study, I examined 30 or 40 different treatments, some of them "snake oils" or "old wives' tales", that are in circulation for treating powdery mildew. Unsurprisingly, most of them did not provide good control, but milk and whey, and also a canola oil-based product, stood out as being comparable to current powdery mildew treatments."

The most successful treatments Mr Crisp has trialled so far are milk and whey (the liquid waste from cheese production). The milk is diluted to 1/10th of its normal strength, and the whey 1/3rd, and the solutions sprayed onto the grapevine leaves and immature grapes. The solutions work well on most grape cultivars and, importantly, don't appear to affect the quality of the grapes and hence the finished wine product, although this needs to be evaluated experimentally. The success of milk as a control of powdery mildew on grapevines supports earlier research on zucchini in Brazil.

"Making sure that the quality is not diminished is very important for the commercial wineries - obviously they don't want to put anything on their grapes which will reduce the quality of their wines, and subsequently reduce the price and reputation the wines can achieve," Mr Crisp says.

The implications of Mr Crisp's research are biggest for organic winemakers, those who don't currently use synthetic fungicides and herbicides for disease and pest control.

"Sulphur is the main form of fungicide used against powdery mildew, and is used in most organic and conventional wineries, with the conventional vineyards using synthetic fungicides as well. Sulphur has been used for 150 years and is pretty effective, but it may in the future be restricted for organic growers to use, and they'll need to find another way which will be cheap and efficient," Mr Crisp says.

Several organic wineries are already involved with Mr Crisp's research, notably Temple Bruer in Langhorne Creek. Temple Bruer Wines CEO David Bruer was former Head of the Oenology Department at the University's Roseworthy campus before becoming a full-time vigneron and has generously allowed Mr Crisp to use a portion of his vineyard for trials. Other wineries involved in Mr Crisp's project include Glenara and Mountadam.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Adelaide University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Adelaide University. "Drop Of White The Right Stuff For Vines." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 September 2002. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/09/020912071438.htm>.
Adelaide University. (2002, September 12). Drop Of White The Right Stuff For Vines. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 4, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/09/020912071438.htm
Adelaide University. "Drop Of White The Right Stuff For Vines." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/09/020912071438.htm (accessed March 4, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Plants & Animals News

Wednesday, March 4, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Rare Goblin Shark Found in Australia

Rare Goblin Shark Found in Australia

AFP (Mar. 3, 2015) A goblin shark, a rare sea creature described as an &apos;alien of the deep&apos; is found off Australia and delivered to the Australian Museum in Sydney. Duration: 01:25 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
500 Snakes Surprise Construction Workers In Canada

500 Snakes Surprise Construction Workers In Canada

Newsy (Mar. 2, 2015) Hundreds of snakes, disturbed by a construction project, were relocated to a wildlife rescue association in Canada. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Going Gluten-Free Could Get You A Tax Break

Going Gluten-Free Could Get You A Tax Break

Newsy (Mar. 2, 2015) If a doctor advises you to remove gluten from your diet, you could get a tax deduction on the amount you spend on gluten-free foods. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Zookeepers Copy Animal Poses In Hilarious Viral Photos

Zookeepers Copy Animal Poses In Hilarious Viral Photos

Buzz60 (Mar. 2, 2015) Zookeepers at the Symbio Wildlife Park in Helensburgh, Australia decided to take some of their favorite animal photos and recreate them by posing just like the animals. Jen Markham (@jenmarkham) has the story. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins