Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Plant-Fungal Symbiosis Found In High-Heat Extreme Environment

Date:
November 27, 2002
Source:
National Science Foundation
Summary:
Researchers examining plants growing in the geothermal soils of Yellowstone National Park and Lassen Volcanic National Park have found evidence of symbiosis between fungi and plants that may hold clues to how plants adapt to and tolerate extreme environments.

ARLINGTON, Va. -- Researchers examining plants growing in the geothermal soils of Yellowstone National Park and Lassen Volcanic National Park have found evidence of symbiosis between fungi and plants that may hold clues to how plants adapt to and tolerate extreme environments.

The research was funded in part through the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Microbial Observatories Program and published in the Nov. 22 issue of the journal Science.

Biologists Regina Redman of the University of Washington and Joan Henson of Montana State University and their colleagues examined 200 samples of Dichanthelium lanuginosum, also called "Geyser's Dichanthelium," for fungal colonization. They found what may be a new species of the fungus Curvularia that survives only in temperatures greater than 98 degrees when it associates with plants.

The researchers suggest that thermotolerance may occur through symbiotic mechanisms like heat dissipation by pigment, such as melanin, or the activation of a "biological trigger" that tells the plant to react to temperature changes more rapidly or strongly than plants that lack the fungus.

The researchers grew sample plants with and without the symbiotic fungus in a laboratory and heated the soil to test thermal resistance. The plants without the fungus shriveled at 122 degrees, whereas those plants with the fungus tolerated the heat for three days. The plants were also subjected to intermittent temperatures as high as 149 degrees. The fungus-free plants died, but the fungus-bearing plants survived for 10 days.

The researchers also demonstrated that the plants provide thermal protection to the fungus by isolating it in plant roots that had a field soil temperature of 113 degrees.

"Scientific understanding of how life can thrive in such extreme environments is at its infancy," said Microbiologist Matt Kane, NSF's Microbial Observatories Program Director. "Research funded by NSF's Microbial Observatories Program is demonstrating that when you look in interesting places, you discovery interesting life forms and interrelationships, such as these fungi and their plant partners."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by National Science Foundation. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

National Science Foundation. "Plant-Fungal Symbiosis Found In High-Heat Extreme Environment." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 November 2002. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/11/021126200722.htm>.
National Science Foundation. (2002, November 27). Plant-Fungal Symbiosis Found In High-Heat Extreme Environment. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/11/021126200722.htm
National Science Foundation. "Plant-Fungal Symbiosis Found In High-Heat Extreme Environment." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/11/021126200722.htm (accessed September 17, 2014).

Share This



More Plants & Animals News

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Chimp Violence Study Renews Debate On Why They Kill

Chimp Violence Study Renews Debate On Why They Kill

Newsy (Sep. 17, 2014) The study weighs in on a debate over whether chimps are naturally violent or become that way due to human interference in the environment. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Some Tobacco Farmers Thrive Amid Challenges

Some Tobacco Farmers Thrive Amid Challenges

AP (Sep. 16, 2014) The South's tobacco country is surviving, and even thriving in some cases, as demand overseas keeps growers in the fields of one of America's oldest cash crops. (Sept. 16) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Given Rare Glimpse of 350-Kilo Colossal Squid

Scientists Given Rare Glimpse of 350-Kilo Colossal Squid

AFP (Sep. 16, 2014) Scientists say a female colossal squid weighing an estimated 350 kilograms (770 lbs) and thought to be only the second intact specimen ever found was carrying eggs when discovered in the Antarctic. Duration: 00:47 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Scientists Examine Colossal Squid

Raw: Scientists Examine Colossal Squid

AP (Sep. 16, 2014) Squid experts in New Zealand thawed and examined an unusual catch on Tuesday: a colossal squid. It was captured in Antarctica's remote Ross Sea in December last year and has been frozen for eight months. (Sept. 16) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins