Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Butterflies Use Polarized Light To Attract Mates

Date:
May 1, 2003
Source:
Smithsonian Institution
Summary:
Up to 20 layers of transparent scales on butterfly wings scatter white light to produce brilliant blue structural color. Alison Sweeney, Duke University, and collaborators at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute report in Nature that polarized light from iridescent female Heliconius butterflies functions as a mating signal. This may be the first example of mate recognition based on polarized light.

Up to 20 layers of transparent scales on butterfly wings scatter white light to produce brilliant blue structural color. Alison Sweeney, Duke University, and collaborators at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute report in Nature that polarized light from iridescent female Heliconius butterflies functions as a mating signal. This may be the first example of mate recognition based on polarized light. Physical properties of wing scales may play an important role in speciation of Heliconius butterflies.

People in small planes flying low over tropical forest often comment about the tiny flashes of blue from iridescent butterfly wings that stand out against dark green jungle foliage. But the ecological significance of light scattering and shaping by butterflies has, for the most part, been overlooked.

Sweeney brings a new emphasis on the physical properties of butterfly wings to a group studying the genetics and ecology of speciation in Heliconius butterflies. She presented moving female butterfly wings to conspecific males with and without filters that eliminate polarized light. Males of an iridescent species approached females producing polarized signals significantly more often when signals were not depolarized. Males of another, non-iridescent species approached females, which do not produce polarized signals, at the same rate regardless of the presence or absence of the depolarizing filters.

Differences in light bending by genetically inherited patterns of butterfly scales may be important in sexual selection and speciation of Heliconius butterflies and may vary according to the specific light environment they occupy in tropical forests.

###

Ref. Alison Sweeney, Christopher Jiggins, Sonke Johnsen. Polarized light as a butterfly mating signal. Nature. 1 May, 2003.

The Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, headquartered in Panama City, Panama, is one of the world΄s leading centers for research on the ecology, evolution and conservation of tropical organisms.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Smithsonian Institution. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Smithsonian Institution. "Butterflies Use Polarized Light To Attract Mates." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 May 2003. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/05/030501080033.htm>.
Smithsonian Institution. (2003, May 1). Butterflies Use Polarized Light To Attract Mates. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/05/030501080033.htm
Smithsonian Institution. "Butterflies Use Polarized Light To Attract Mates." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/05/030501080033.htm (accessed September 23, 2014).

Share This



More Plants & Animals News

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Raw: Ice Age Wooly Mammoth Remains for Sale

Raw: Ice Age Wooly Mammoth Remains for Sale

AP (Sep. 23, 2014) — A rare, well-preserved skeleton of a woolly mammoth is going on sale at Summers Place Auctions hope the 11.5-foot tall, almost intact specimen will fetch between $245,000 to $409,000. (Sept. 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Fox Bites Conn. Student And School Staffers In Rare Attack

Fox Bites Conn. Student And School Staffers In Rare Attack

Newsy (Sep. 23, 2014) — A fox attacked a second-grade boy at a Connecticut elementary school Monday. It also attacked two school staff members and a woman and her dog. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Will Living Glue Be A Thing?

Will Living Glue Be A Thing?

Newsy (Sep. 23, 2014) — Using proteins derived from mussels, engineers at MIT have made a supersticky underwater adhesive. They're now looking to make "living glue." Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Tiger Kills Man at India Zoo

Raw: Tiger Kills Man at India Zoo

AP (Sep. 23, 2014) — A white tiger killed a young man who climbed over a fence at the New Delhi zoo and jumped into the animal's enclosure on Tuesday, a spokesman said. (Sept. 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins