Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

NIAID Opens Innovative Treatment Study For West Nile Virus

Date:
September 10, 2003
Source:
NIH/National Institute Of Allergy And Infectious Diseases
Summary:
A clinical trial evaluating an experimental treatment for patients infected with West Nile virus (WNV) has begun enrolling volunteers at 36 sites nationwide, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), one of the National Institutes of Health, announced.

A clinical trial evaluating an experimental treatment for patients infected with West Nile virus (WNV) has begun enrolling volunteers at 36 sites nationwide, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), one of the National Institutes of Health, announced today. This study is part of a larger effort by NIAID to develop new ways to prevent and treat the disease.

"West Nile virus has emerged as a problem in the United States again this year, and public health officials are particularly concerned because the disease appears to be spreading more quickly and more widely than last year," comments Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., NIAID director. "NIAID is excited to be supporting this clinical trial for a specific therapeutic intervention against WNV.

"Currently, clinicians can provide only supportive care for patients infected with WNV," notes Dr. Fauci. "We hope that the results from this study will ultimately give physicians and their patients a useful treatment option."

The new study will assess whether WNV-infected individuals given antibodies to the virus--one of the immune system's arsenal of disease-fighting weapons--are better able to fend off the severe symptoms of WNV, such as encephalitis, that contribute to the deaths of many individuals who become infected.

Omrix, an Israeli company partnering with NIAID on this study, has an immunoglobulin product that contains antibodies to WNV. Omrix developed this immunoglobulin treatment from the plasma of Israeli donors who have high levels of antibodies to WNV. WNV has been endemic in Israel for decades, and many Israelis who give blood have antibodies to WNV. By giving patients the immunoglobulin product (called Omr-IgG-amÔ) containing the WNV antibodies, researchers hope to help fight the virus in the brain of infected individuals who have developed WNV encephalitis--an inflammation of the brain--or who are at risk for developing this complication.

"This study will provide important information on the safety of intravenous immunoglobulin G-containing antibodies to WNV for treatment of encephalitis," says study chair Richard Whitley, M.D., of the University of Alabama at Birmingham. In addition to determining if Omr-IgG-amÔ is safe and well-tolerated, the study will collect information on the efficacy of this treatment in preventing death or neurologic disability. The study also will help researchers characterize the natural history of severe WNV infection.

The study seeks to enroll 100 hospitalized patients 18 years of age or older who have WNV-related encephalitis or are determined to be at risk of developing encephalitis based on clinical symptoms and the presence of antibodies to the virus. Patients will be assigned at random to one of three groups: those given standard intravenous immunoglobulin from U.S. sources (which has no detectable antibodies to WNV); those given Omr-IgG-amÔ; or those given a placebo. Each participant will receive a single-dose infusion of drug or placebo and will be observed for the first week and then at days 7 and 14, and at 1 and 3 months.

Volunteers are being recruited through NIAID's Collaborative Antiviral Study Group (CASG), based at 35 sites around the country (for more information, see the CASG Web site at www.casg.uab.edu) and through the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. More information on the trial and participating sites also can be found at www.clinicaltrials.gov. NIAID's Walla Dempsey, Ph.D., is project officer on the contract that funds the study.

Information about NIAID's research on WNV can be found at http://www.niaid.nih.gov/publications/wnile/default.htm.

NIAID is a component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), which is an agency of the Department of Health and Human Services. NIAID supports basic and applied research to prevent, diagnose and treat infectious and immune-mediated illnesses, including HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, illness from potential agents of bioterrorism, tuberculosis, malaria, autoimmune disorders, asthma and allergies.

Press releases, fact sheets and other NIAID-related materials are available on the NIAID Web site at http://www.niaid.nih.gov.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by NIH/National Institute Of Allergy And Infectious Diseases. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

NIH/National Institute Of Allergy And Infectious Diseases. "NIAID Opens Innovative Treatment Study For West Nile Virus." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 September 2003. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/09/030910073540.htm>.
NIH/National Institute Of Allergy And Infectious Diseases. (2003, September 10). NIAID Opens Innovative Treatment Study For West Nile Virus. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/09/030910073540.htm
NIH/National Institute Of Allergy And Infectious Diseases. "NIAID Opens Innovative Treatment Study For West Nile Virus." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/09/030910073540.htm (accessed September 21, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, September 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Sierra Leone in Lockdown to Control Ebola

Sierra Leone in Lockdown to Control Ebola

AP (Sep. 21, 2014) — Sierra Leone residents remained in lockdown on Saturday as part of a massive effort to confine millions of people to their homes in a bid to stem the biggest Ebola outbreak in history. (Sept. 20) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sierra Leone's Nationwide Ebola Curfew Underway

Sierra Leone's Nationwide Ebola Curfew Underway

Newsy (Sep. 20, 2014) — Sierra Leone is locked down as aid workers and volunteers look for new cases of Ebola. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Changes Found In Brain After One Dose Of Antidepressants

Changes Found In Brain After One Dose Of Antidepressants

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) — A study suggest antidepressants can kick in much sooner than previously thought. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) — The study found elderly people are much more likely to become susceptible to infection than younger adults going though a similar situation. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins