Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

White Blood Cell Plays Key Role In Body's Excessive Repair Response To Asthma

Date:
October 2, 2003
Source:
Imperial College Of Science, Technology And Medicine
Summary:
Researchers in London and Montreal report that they have discovered an important link in the development of the body's response to allergic asthma. They have found that one type of white blood cell, an eosinophil, which was known to cause inflammation of lung airways, is also responsible for driving the process which leads to an excessive 'repair response' by the body.

October 1, 2003 -- Researchers in London and Montreal report today that they have discovered an important link in the development of the body's response to allergic asthma.

They have found that one type of white blood cell, an eosinophil, which was known to cause inflammation of lung airways, is also responsible for driving the process which leads to an excessive 'repair response' by the body.

The response, which is called airway remodelling, causes structural changes in the airway walls and can sometimes lead to permanent scarring and narrowing of the airways, resulting in worse and repeated asthma episodes for sufferers.

The team of scientists from Imperial College London, the Royal Brompton Hospital, London, Guys Hospital, London, McGill University Hospital Centre, Montreal, and St Barts and the Royal London Hospitals Trust, report that the damaging effects of eosinophils in the remodelling process can be significantly reduced by injection of a single specific antibody.

Their research published today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation shows that the monoclonal antibody anti-Interleukin-5 (mepolizumab) both reduces the number of eosinophils in the bronchi and significantly decreases the deposition of special proteins associated with the remodelling process.

The scientists hope their work may lead to the development of 'really effective' new asthma treatments that work by interfering with the remodelling process.

Leader of the research, Professor Barry Kay, of Imperial College London and the Royal Brompton Hospital, comments: "This research could be of considerable long term benefit in developing more effective treatments in asthma. We already know that eosinophils cause inflammation in the bronchi, but it is the subsequent repair process which may be more important in long term chronic disease.

"In the future, drugs may be available which completely interfere with the process of scarring or re-modelling, and may prove beneficial in the long term treatment of asthma."

Professor Kay adds: "Anti-IL-5 will not be a magic bullet for asthma sufferers, but it could be an important first step in developing really effective drugs which interfere with re-modelling."

Anti-IL5, which removes Interleukin-5, a key molecule in eosinophil development, was given to mild asthmatics as part of a randomised, double blind, placebo controlled protocol.

The 24 patients in the study received three infusions of either the antibody or a placebo dummy injection one month apart, and had a biopsy of the lining of the breathing tubes before and after each infusion. The scientists measured levels of extra cellular matrix (ECM) proteins in the biopsy samples, which indicated the levels of remodelling activity in the airway.

The research was supported by grants from GlaxoSmithKline plc and the Wellcome Trust.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Imperial College Of Science, Technology And Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Imperial College Of Science, Technology And Medicine. "White Blood Cell Plays Key Role In Body's Excessive Repair Response To Asthma." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 October 2003. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/10/031002055442.htm>.
Imperial College Of Science, Technology And Medicine. (2003, October 2). White Blood Cell Plays Key Role In Body's Excessive Repair Response To Asthma. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/10/031002055442.htm
Imperial College Of Science, Technology And Medicine. "White Blood Cell Plays Key Role In Body's Excessive Repair Response To Asthma." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/10/031002055442.htm (accessed September 21, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, September 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Sierra Leone in Lockdown to Control Ebola

Sierra Leone in Lockdown to Control Ebola

AP (Sep. 21, 2014) Sierra Leone residents remained in lockdown on Saturday as part of a massive effort to confine millions of people to their homes in a bid to stem the biggest Ebola outbreak in history. (Sept. 20) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sierra Leone's Nationwide Ebola Curfew Underway

Sierra Leone's Nationwide Ebola Curfew Underway

Newsy (Sep. 20, 2014) Sierra Leone is locked down as aid workers and volunteers look for new cases of Ebola. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Changes Found In Brain After One Dose Of Antidepressants

Changes Found In Brain After One Dose Of Antidepressants

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) A study suggest antidepressants can kick in much sooner than previously thought. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) The study found elderly people are much more likely to become susceptible to infection than younger adults going though a similar situation. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins