Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Scientists Seize Golden Business Opportunity: New Material Could Save Electronics Industry Millions

Date:
October 23, 2003
Source:
University Of Newcastle Upon Tyne
Summary:
Scientists have created a new material which could save the electronics industry millions of pounds each year and could also be more effective. Several attempts have been made over the last twenty years to make gold nitride but now a researcher at the University of Newcastle upon Tyne has solved the puzzle.

Scientists have created a new material which could save the electronics industry millions of pounds each year and could also be more effective.

Several attempts have been made over the last twenty years to make gold nitride but now a researcher at the University of Newcastle upon Tyne has solved the puzzle.

Gold is used extensively in the electronics industry, as a conductor of electricity in products such as computers, mobile phones and smart cards. This is because it is relatively stable when exposed to the atmosphere.

However, gold is also one of the most expensive metals on the market, and is therefore combined with other, cheaper substances such as nickel, iron and colbalt salt before it is used in order to improve hardness.

Newcastle University's Dr Lidija Siller, who has created the gold nitride, believes it could be harder and more durable than current gold alloys - which could mean a much thinner gold plating layer could be applied to products, thus reducing manufacturing costs.

Further tests need to be carried out, however, to fully assess its potential.

Dr Siller, of the School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials, used a technique called ion implantation to create the material.

She placed the gold in an experimental chamber under ultra high vacuum, cleaned it with argon and then heated up the gold crystal. This was then irradiated with nitrogen ions using a spattering gun. As it is invisible to the naked eye she then checked whether gold nitride had been formed by looking at it using X-ray techniques.

Dr Siller, who began her experiments with gold nitride in 2001, said: "I am starting to investigate its properties and to see how it performs in terms of conductivity and durabililty.

"Early indications suggest that it will certainly be cheaper to manufacture, as nitrogen makes up 80 per cent of the atmosphere around us.

"It is harmless and does not provide a pollution risk unlike some of the metals which are usually mixed with gold, such as arsenic, lead or colbalt."

Previous attempts to make gold nitride failed because they were based on scientists' misunderstanding of the kinetic reaction between gold and nitrogen, Dr Siller said.

The University has filed a patent for the gold nitride process whilst Dr Siller is attempting to make further modifications to the substance to test whether it will have widespread use in industry.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Newcastle Upon Tyne. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Newcastle Upon Tyne. "Scientists Seize Golden Business Opportunity: New Material Could Save Electronics Industry Millions." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 October 2003. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/10/031023071459.htm>.
University Of Newcastle Upon Tyne. (2003, October 23). Scientists Seize Golden Business Opportunity: New Material Could Save Electronics Industry Millions. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/10/031023071459.htm
University Of Newcastle Upon Tyne. "Scientists Seize Golden Business Opportunity: New Material Could Save Electronics Industry Millions." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/10/031023071459.htm (accessed August 22, 2014).

Share This




More Matter & Energy News

Friday, August 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Is It a Plane? No, It's a Hoverbike

Is It a Plane? No, It's a Hoverbike

Reuters - Business Video Online (Aug. 22, 2014) UK-based Malloy Aeronautics is preparing to test a manned quadcopter capable of out-manouvering a helicopter and presenting a new paradigm for aerial vehicles. A 1/3-sized scale model is already gaining popularity with drone enthusiasts around the world, with the full-sized manned model expected to take flight in the near future. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Coal Gas Boom in China Holds Climate Risks

Coal Gas Boom in China Holds Climate Risks

AP (Aug. 22, 2014) China's energy revolution could do more harm than good for the environment, despite the country's commitment to reducing pollution and curbing its carbon emissions. (Aug. 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Former TSA X-Ray Scanners Easily Tricked To Miss Weapons

Former TSA X-Ray Scanners Easily Tricked To Miss Weapons

Newsy (Aug. 21, 2014) Researchers found the scanners could be duped simply by placing a weapon off to the side of the body or encasing it under a plastic shield. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Flower Power! Dandelions Make Car Tires?

Flower Power! Dandelions Make Car Tires?

Reuters - Business Video Online (Aug. 20, 2014) Forget rolling on rubber, could car drivers soon be traveling on tires made from dandelions? Teams of scientists are racing to breed a type of the yellow flower whose taproot has a milky fluid with tire-grade rubber particles in it. As Joanna Partridge reports, global tire makers are investing millions in research into a new tire source. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins