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Measuring Artificial Viruses To Improve Disease Detection

Date:
July 5, 2004
Source:
National Institute Of Standards And Technology (NIST)
Summary:
A new method developed by researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for accurately measuring the concentration of artificial viruses in a solution may ultimately help doctors diagnose diseases like HIV and hepatitis C earlier.

A new method* developed by researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for accurately measuring the concentration of artificial viruses in a solution may ultimately help doctors diagnose diseases like HIV and hepatitis C earlier.

These artificial viruses are commercial standards made from the same basic chemical components in RNA (the single stranded version of DNA needed for protein synthesis.) They are constructed to be nearly identical chemically to real viruses but are encased with a protein covering to prevent degradation. The standards are currently used in research laboratories to help check analysis methods for detecting specific types of RNA, but the product has not been approved for clinical use.

What's needed according to NIST researcher Susan Krueger is a standard, reliable way to measure the concentration of artificial RNA in solution. By knowing exactly how much of the "fake" virus is present in a patient sample, a lab can better detect any additional signal caused by real virus molecules. Traditional methods for measuring concentrations don't work well with the new product since the artificial viruses are not infectious.

Instead, NIST scientists measured the concentration of artificial RNA virus solutions using a beam of neutrons as probes. As neutrons pass through the test solution, they interact in very specific ways with particular atoms, providing scientists with detailed information on molecular weight and geometry. This information can be used to very accurately measure the amount of RNA in a given solution. Precise calibration of artificial RNA concentrations may, in turn, allow laboratories to reliably detect lower concentrations of real viruses at earlier stages of infection.

###

The NIST research was conducted in collaboration with the U.S. Army Aberdeen Proving Ground, Aberdeen, Md.

*The researchers presented their work at the second American Conference on Neutron Scattering, held June 6-10, in College Park, Md.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by National Institute Of Standards And Technology (NIST). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

National Institute Of Standards And Technology (NIST). "Measuring Artificial Viruses To Improve Disease Detection." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 July 2004. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/07/040705082341.htm>.
National Institute Of Standards And Technology (NIST). (2004, July 5). Measuring Artificial Viruses To Improve Disease Detection. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/07/040705082341.htm
National Institute Of Standards And Technology (NIST). "Measuring Artificial Viruses To Improve Disease Detection." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/07/040705082341.htm (accessed October 20, 2014).

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