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Blasted Coral Reefs Need Tender, Low-Cost Care

Date:
February 5, 2005
Source:
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Summary:
Blast or dynamite fishing creates a loss of sustainable fishery income, coastal protection, and tourism that is more than 50 times higher than the short-term benefits from the fish caught. This extreme form of overfishing destroys not only the fish and invertebrate stocks, but the coral reefs themselves.
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Blast or dynamite fishing creates a loss of sustainable fishery income, coastal protection, and tourism that is more than 50 times higher than the short-term benefits from the fish caught. This extreme form of overfishing destroys not only the fish and invertebrate stocks, but the coral reefs themselves.

In the latest issue of Conservation Biology, researchers report on the effectiveness of different low-cost methods for coral reef rehabilitation in Komodo National Park, Indonesia. Most transplantation and coral rehabilitation techniques are too costly and are inappropriate for the shifting rubble fields created by blast fishing in high current areas. The researchers found that, “assuming there is an adequate larval supply, using rocks for simple, low-budget, large-scale rehabilitation appears to be a viable option for restoring the structural foundation of damaged reefs.” However, they also found that natural recovery was slow, highlighting the need for preventing blast fishing.

Despite being outlawed, blast fishing, which Indonesia banned in 1985, is still widespread. Population growth, economic pressure, and declining catches often drive fisherman to destroy their resource base for a quick profit. “Programs that successfully decrease this destructive fishing practice and restore value to the ecosystem are critical, both economically and biologically,” the researchers conclude.

This study is published in the current issue of Conservation Biology.

Conservation Biology is a top-ranked journal in the fields of Ecology and Environmental Science and has been called, “required reading for ecologists throughout the world.” It is published on behalf of the Society for Conservation Biology .

Helen Fox is a Marine Conservation Biologist and Senior Program Officer in the Conservation Science Program, World Wildlife Fund. She has worked extensively in reef recovery programs.


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The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


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Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. "Blasted Coral Reefs Need Tender, Low-Cost Care." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 February 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/02/050204114918.htm>.
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. (2005, February 5). Blasted Coral Reefs Need Tender, Low-Cost Care. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 1, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/02/050204114918.htm
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. "Blasted Coral Reefs Need Tender, Low-Cost Care." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/02/050204114918.htm (accessed August 1, 2015).

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