Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Epstein-Barr Virus Protein Crucial To Its Role In Blood Cancers

Date:
April 6, 2005
Source:
University Of Pennsylvania Medical Center
Summary:
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have identified a link between a critical cancer pathway and an Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) protein known to be expressed in a number of EBV-associated cancers. Their findings demonstrate a new mechanism by which EBV transforms human B cells from the immune system into cancerous cells, which can lead to development of B-cell lymphomas.

Philadelphia, PA – Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have identified a link between a critical cancer pathway and an Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) protein known to be expressed in a number of EBV-associated cancers. Their findings demonstrate a new mechanism by which EBV transforms human B cells from the immune system into cancerous cells, which can lead to development of B-cell lymphomas.

Related Articles


Erle S. Robertson, PhD, Associate Professor of Microbiology and Director of Tumor Virology, with Penn's Abramson Cancer Center and MD/PhD student Jason Knight, published their results in the early March issue of Molecular and Cellular Biology.

Using human cell cultures infected with the Epstein-Barr virus, the investigators found that a specific viral protein targets a molecule that normally regulates the cell-cycle progression, or duplication process, of resting B cells. In the presence of this viral protein – called EBNA3C (for EBV nuclear antigen) – the cell cycle of the usually quiescent human B cells gets a jump start, which ultimately initiates uncontrolled growth.

EBV, a member of the herpesvirus family and one of the most common human viruses, plays a role in cancers such as lymphoproliferative diseases in transplant or AIDS patients, Burkitt's lymphoma, Hodgkin's lymphoma, and nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and also causes the well-known disease, infectious mononucleosis. As many as 95 percent of adults 20 years and older have been infected with EBV, but show no symptoms.

"Viruses that are associated with cancers typically target the cell cycle to gain control," says Robertson. "However, this is the first time that laboratory research into how EBV drives the cancer process has directly identified a critical component of the cell cycle for control. Now we can develop targeted therapeutics to disrupt the function of this viral protein." The researchers surmise that the first use of future therapies from these studies will be in lymphoproliferative disease in transplant and immunocompromised patients because this is a clear case of EBV-driven B-cell lymphoma.

The use of peptides to block the interaction between this essential EBV protein and the specific pathway in human B cells is currently underway. Initial studies show that the growth of EBV-associated cancer cells can be inhibited in tissue-culture assays. The investigators are actively pursuing this line of investigation for developing potential therapies.

###

This research was funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Leukemia and Lymophoma Society of America. Nikhil Sharma, a student from Cherokee High School, New Jersey who volunteers at Penn, was also a co-investigator in this study.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Pennsylvania Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Pennsylvania Medical Center. "Epstein-Barr Virus Protein Crucial To Its Role In Blood Cancers." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 April 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/03/050329131312.htm>.
University Of Pennsylvania Medical Center. (2005, April 6). Epstein-Barr Virus Protein Crucial To Its Role In Blood Cancers. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 26, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/03/050329131312.htm
University Of Pennsylvania Medical Center. "Epstein-Barr Virus Protein Crucial To Its Role In Blood Cancers." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/03/050329131312.htm (accessed March 26, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, March 26, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

House Ready to Pass Medicare Doc Bill

House Ready to Pass Medicare Doc Bill

AP (Mar. 26, 2015) In rare bipartisan harmony, congressional leaders pushed a $214 billion bill permanently blocking physician Medicare cuts toward House passage Thursday, moving lawmakers closer to resolving a problem that has plagued them for years. (March 26) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
HIV Outbreak Prompts Public Health Emergency In Indiana

HIV Outbreak Prompts Public Health Emergency In Indiana

Newsy (Mar. 26, 2015) Indiana Gov. Mike Pence says he will bring additional state resources to help stop the epidemic. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
AAA: Distracted Driving a Serious Teen Problem

AAA: Distracted Driving a Serious Teen Problem

AP (Mar. 25, 2015) While distracted driving is not a new problem for teens, new research from the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety says it&apos;s much more serious than previously thought. (March 25) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Obama: Affordable Care Act 'saving Lives'

Obama: Affordable Care Act 'saving Lives'

AP (Mar. 25, 2015) Speaking at a White House event marking the fifth anniversary of the Affordable Care Act, President Barack Obama says the law is "saving lives that touch all of us." (March 25) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins