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UCLA Scientists Pinpoint Region Of Autism Gene On Chromosome 17

Date:
May 4, 2005
Source:
University Of California Los Angeles -- Health Sciences
Summary:
For the first time, a team of UCLA geneticists have isolated the likely region of an autism gene on chromosome 17 and then successfully duplicated their efforts in a separate population. In an earlier discovery, the scientists were surprised to find that the gene contributes to autism only in boys, perhaps explaining why girls have a dramatically lower risk of developing the disease.

Autism is a complex disease caused by the interaction of multiple genes and environmental influences. As a result, scientists' previous attempts to locate a genetic risk factor have proved inconclusive. No researchers have been able to pinpoint a predisposing gene and then duplicate their efforts -- a key piece of proof required for scientific validity.

For the first time, a team of UCLA geneticists have isolated the likely region of an autism gene on chromosome 17 and then successfully duplicated their efforts in a separate population. In an earlier discovery, the scientists were surprised to find that the gene contributes to autism only in boys, perhaps explaining why girls have a dramatically lower risk of developing the disease.

After twice linking the risk gene to band 17Q21, the UCLA team is now conducting DNA testing to identify the precise site on the chromosome, which will bring them closer to finding the gene mutation. This is the first step to providing better screening and potential treatments for autism.

Authors of the study include Dr. Dan Geschwind, associate professor of neurology; Rita Cantor, adjunct professor of human genetics; Stan Nelson, professor of human genetics; Jennifer Stone, graduate student researcher, at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.

JOURNAL
The American Journal of Human Genetics, June 2005
http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/AJHG/journal/issues/v76n6/42136/42136.html

FUNDING
National Institute of Mental Health


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of California Los Angeles -- Health Sciences. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of California Los Angeles -- Health Sciences. "UCLA Scientists Pinpoint Region Of Autism Gene On Chromosome 17." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 May 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/05/050504224433.htm>.
University Of California Los Angeles -- Health Sciences. (2005, May 4). UCLA Scientists Pinpoint Region Of Autism Gene On Chromosome 17. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/05/050504224433.htm
University Of California Los Angeles -- Health Sciences. "UCLA Scientists Pinpoint Region Of Autism Gene On Chromosome 17." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/05/050504224433.htm (accessed April 23, 2014).

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