Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Penn Study Shows Genes May Affect Response To Different Quit-smoking Medications

Date:
August 30, 2005
Source:
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
Summary:
A study by researchers at the Transdisciplinary Tobacco Use Research Center (TTURC) of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine indicates that a smoker's genetic make-up may affect whether they quit or not while using either bupropion (Zyban©) or nicotine replacement therapies (NRTs) such as the nicotine patch or nasal spray.

Philadelphia, PA -- A study by researchers at the TransdisciplinaryTobacco Use Research Center (TTURC) of the University of PennsylvaniaSchool of Medicine indicates that a smoker's genetic make-up may affectwhether they quit or not while using either bupropion (Zyban) ornicotine replacement therapies (NRTs) such as the nicotine patch ornasal spray. The results appear in the August issue ofNeuropsychopharmacology.

Related Articles


"This study provides new evidence thatgenetic differences in the brain-reward pathways of smokers may revealwhether they would benefit more from Zyban© or nicotine replacementtherapy as an aid to quitting smoking," said lead author ProfessorCaryn Lerman, PhD, Director of the TTURC and Associate Director forCancer Control Population Sciences at Penn's Abramson Cancer Center.

Lermanled a research team that completed two randomized clinical trials eachwith a six-month follow-up period: a double blind placebo-controlledtrial of bupropion and an open-label trial of transdermal nicotinepatch versus nicotine nasal spray. Both trials examined the roles offunctional genetic variation in the dopamine D2 Receptor (DRD2) genecalled DRD2 –141C. At this location in the DRD2 gene, people carry oneof two different variants, a Del C variant or an Ins C variant (Del isfor deletion and Ins is for Insertion). The research team found thatsmokers with two copies of the DRD2 -141 Ins C variant weresignificantly more likely to be abstinent at the six-month follow-up ifthey used

Zyban©, as compared to smokers carrying the Del Cvariant. By contrast, smokers carrying the Del C variant hadsignificantly higher quit rates if they used NRTs as compared to thosewith the Ins C variant. This research may have important implicationsfor the delivery of quit-smoking medications that are targeted toindividual smokers' needs. "Although these results require confirmationin a larger study prior to translation to practice," said Lerman, "theydo suggest that genetic information may be useful in selecting the typeof nicotine dependence treatment that will be most beneficial for aparticular smoker."

###

This research was funded by theNational Cancer Institute and the National Institute on Drug Abuse andwas conducted by the University of Pennsylvania TransdisciplinaryTobacco Use Research Center.

About the Abramson Cancer Center:
The Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania wasestablished in 1973 as a center of excellence in cancer research,patient care, education and outreach. Today, the Abramson Cancer Centerranks as one of the nation's best in cancer care, according to U.S.News and World Report, and is one of the top five in National CancerInstitute (NCI) funding. It is one of only 39 NCI-designatedcomprehensive cancer centers in the United States. Home to one of thelargest clinical and research programs in the world, the AbramsonCancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania has 275 active cancerresearchers and 250 Penn physicians involved in cancer prevention,diagnosis and treatment. More information about the Abramson CancerCenter is available at: www.pennhealth.com/cancer


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. "Penn Study Shows Genes May Affect Response To Different Quit-smoking Medications." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 August 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/08/050830065415.htm>.
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. (2005, August 30). Penn Study Shows Genes May Affect Response To Different Quit-smoking Medications. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/08/050830065415.htm
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. "Penn Study Shows Genes May Affect Response To Different Quit-smoking Medications." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/08/050830065415.htm (accessed November 28, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, November 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Rural India's Low-Cost Sanitary Pad Revolution

Rural India's Low-Cost Sanitary Pad Revolution

AFP (Nov. 28, 2014) — One man hopes his invention -– a machine that produces cheap sanitary pads –- will help empower Indian women. Duration: 01:51 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Research on Bats Could Help Develop Drugs Against Ebola

Research on Bats Could Help Develop Drugs Against Ebola

AFP (Nov. 28, 2014) — In Africa's only biosafety level 4 laboratory, scientists have been carrying out experiments on bats to understand how virus like Ebola are being transmitted, and how some of them resist to it. Duration: 01:18 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
WHO Says Male Ebola Survivors Should Abstain From Sex

WHO Says Male Ebola Survivors Should Abstain From Sex

Newsy (Nov. 28, 2014) — WHO cites four studies that say Ebola can still be detected in semen up to 82 days after the onset of symptoms. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

AFP (Nov. 27, 2014) — The Ebola epidemic sweeping Sierra Leone is having a profound effect on the country's children, many of whom have been left without any family members to support them. Duration: 01:02 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins