Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

A Space Station View On Giant Lightning

Date:
October 4, 2005
Source:
European Space Agency
Summary:
Do giant flashes of lightning striking upwards from thunder clouds merely pose an extraordinarily spectacular view? Or do they actually alter the chemical composition of the atmosphere, playing a role in ozone depletion and the climate on Earth? This is the key question that may be answered by specially designed cameras, which ESA proposes to place on board the International Space Station.

Altitude seperates blue jets (lowest altitude) from red sprites (middle) and elves (highest).
Credit: Danish National Space Center

Related Articles


TheInternational Space Station (ISS) is the ideal setting for studies ofspectacular natural phenomena well hidden from us on Earth - so-calledred sprites, blue jets and elves: vast flashes of lightning strikingnot from clouds to the ground, but from clouds towards space.

Normallythe word lightning makes us think of sharp zigzag lines striking fromthe clouds to the ground. Above the clouds however a quite differenttype of lightning can be seen. There lightning is colourful - mainlyred and blue - and covers large areas of the upper atmosphere.Sometimes it can even reach the border between the atmosphere and space.

Overthe last few years scientists from the Danish National Space Centrehave studied these flashes with cameras placed on mountain tops. Everyso often the cameras would catch a flash of lightning striking up froma thunder cloud at a lower altitude.

Placing cameras and otherinstruments on the Space Station would, however, dramatically improvethe chances of seeing the giant flashes and study their effect on theatmosphere. The Danish National Space Centre is currently studying apackage of instruments for just that purpose, known as theAtmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor (ASIM). ESA has now selected ASIMfor a feasibility study (known as Phase A).

"The question is howare these giant flashes of lightning created and how often do they takeplace", says senior scientist Torben Neubert, head of the project atDanish National Space Centre.

It may well be that the largeelectrical bursts remove ozone from the atmosphere, and in so doinginfluence the climate. "We need to understand the natural processeswhich influence the atmosphere and this can help us decide whichchanges in the climate are man-made", Torben Neubert states.

It is still too early to say when the cameras will actually enter into service in space.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by European Space Agency. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

European Space Agency. "A Space Station View On Giant Lightning." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 October 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/10/051004085350.htm>.
European Space Agency. (2005, October 4). A Space Station View On Giant Lightning. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 31, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/10/051004085350.htm
European Space Agency. "A Space Station View On Giant Lightning." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/10/051004085350.htm (accessed January 31, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Earth & Climate News

Saturday, January 31, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Raw: Rare Clouds Fill Grand Canyon

Raw: Rare Clouds Fill Grand Canyon

AP (Jan. 29, 2015) For the second time in two months, a rare weather phenomenon filled the Grand Canyon with thick clouds just below the rim on Wednesday. (Jan. 29) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Senate Passes Bill for Keystone XL Pipeline

Senate Passes Bill for Keystone XL Pipeline

AP (Jan. 29, 2015) The Republican-controlled Senate has passed a bipartisan bill approving construction of the Keystone XL oil pipeline. (Jan. 29) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
"Cloud Inversion" In Grand Canyon

"Cloud Inversion" In Grand Canyon

Reuters - US Online Video (Jan. 29, 2015) Time lapse video captures a blanket of clouds amassing in the Grand Canyon -- the result of a rare meteorological process called "cloud inversion." Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Why Researchers Say We Should Cut Back On Biofuels

Why Researchers Say We Should Cut Back On Biofuels

Newsy (Jan. 29, 2015) Biofuels aren&apos;t the best alternative to fossil fuels, according to a new report. In fact, they&apos;re quite a bad one. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins