Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Immune Signals Of Variations Of A Single Gene Linked To More Severe Crohn's Disease

Date:
May 23, 2006
Source:
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
Summary:
A recent study has shown that immune signals given by variations of a single gene can trigger different immune responses and, when combined, are associated with increased severity of Crohn's Disease, particularly in Ashkenazi Jews. The study is being presented at the annual meeting of the American Gastroenterological Association May 20-25 in Los Angeles.

Building on previous evidence supporting the theory that the pathophysiology of Crohn's Disease is altered by genetic variation, recent studies have found that the combination of immune signals given by three variants of a single candidate gene affects the severity of the disease, particularly among Ashkenazi Jews. The findings, presented at the annual meeting of the American Gastroenterological Association, were reported by researchers from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, the University of Washington and Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

Related Articles


Crohn's Disease is an inflammatory bowel disease that causes inflammation or ulceration of the gastrointestinal tract and can sometimes run in families. While the cause is unknown, many professionals believe that the body's immune system may overreact to normal intestinal bacteria or that disease-causing bacteria and viruses may play a role in triggering the condition.

The recent study, funded by the National Institutes of Health, shows the effect of one particular gene a Crohn's Disease candidate gene named TLR 5 on both Jews and non-Jews with the disease.

It is estimated that American Jews are three times more likely to develop Crohn's Disease than the population as a whole. Approximately 80 percent of the six million Jews in the United States are Ashkenazi Jews, an ethnic group whose ancestors are from eastern and central Europe,

As Jerome I. Rotter, M.D., first author of the study, director of research and co-director of the Medical Genetics Institute at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center explained, the innate immune system senses micro-organisms and pathogens using a family of proteins known as the Toll-Like Receptors (TLRs). This recognition activates both the innate and adaptive immune system, with each TLR recognizing a specific pattern of microbial components.

The aim of the study was to investigate three TLR5 gene variants and their relationship to Crohn's Disease, the response to two types of bacterial antigens (OmpC porin and CBir1 flagellin) and their relationship to ethnicity. There were 889 Crohn's Disease patients in the study and 236 controls (persons without Crohn's Disease).

"An important part of the study was its approach. By subdividing the subjects by ethnicity and antibody response we were able to show that the candidate gene TLR5 has an effect in both Jews and non-Jews, but its effects are particularly noteworthy in the Jewish population," Rotter said.

While the treatment of Crohn's Disease is improving, it is still associated with a high morbidity and a large number of hospitalizations and surgeries, Rotter said. "This study demonstrates that it will be important to include ethnicity, clinical phenotypes and quantitative physiologic traits in future investigations that may eventually lead to new and better therapies for Crohn's Disease's different sub-forms."

Researchers from Cedars-Sinai's Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center and Medical Genetics Institute authored 23 other studies that will be presented at the association's annual meeting.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. "Immune Signals Of Variations Of A Single Gene Linked To More Severe Crohn's Disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 May 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/05/060523085937.htm>.
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. (2006, May 23). Immune Signals Of Variations Of A Single Gene Linked To More Severe Crohn's Disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 1, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/05/060523085937.htm
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. "Immune Signals Of Variations Of A Single Gene Linked To More Severe Crohn's Disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/05/060523085937.htm (accessed April 1, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Wound-Healing Laser Soon to Be a Reality Israeli Scientist

Wound-Healing Laser Soon to Be a Reality Israeli Scientist

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Apr. 1, 2015) Israeli scientists says laser bonding of tissue allows much faster healing and less scarring. Amy Pollock has more. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Liberia Sees Resurgence of Drug Trafficking as Ebola Wanes

Liberia Sees Resurgence of Drug Trafficking as Ebola Wanes

AFP (Apr. 1, 2015) The governments of Liberia and Sierra Leone have been busy fighting the menace created by the deadly Ebola virus, but illicit drug lords have taken advantage of the situation to advance the drug trade. Duration: 01:12 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Stigma Stalks India's Leprosy Sufferers as Disease Returns

Stigma Stalks India's Leprosy Sufferers as Disease Returns

AFP (Apr. 1, 2015) The Indian government declared victory over leprosy in 2005, but the disease is making a comeback in some parts of the country, with more than a hundred thousand lepers still living in colonies, shunned from society. Duration: 02:41 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
7-Year-Old Girl Gets 3-D Printed 'robohand'

7-Year-Old Girl Gets 3-D Printed 'robohand'

AP (Mar. 31, 2015) Although she never had much interest in prosthetic limbs before, Faith Lennox couldn&apos;t wait to slip on her new robohand. The 7-year-old, who lost part of her left arm when she was a baby, grabbed it as soon as it came off a 3-D printer. (March 31) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins