Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Bacterial Parasite Strives For Balance In Host Infection

Date:
May 31, 2006
Source:
Public Library of Science
Summary:
Exposing replicate Daphnia hosts to the same amount of bacterial spores from the castrating bacterium Pasteuria ramose provides experimental evidence that parasite fitness is maximized at intermediate levels of virulence, according to a study published in PLoS Biology.

Exposing Daphnia host clones to spores from the castrating bacterium Pasteuria ramosa provides experimental evidence that parasite fitness is maximized at intermediate levels of virulence.
Credit: Jensen et al / PLoS Biology

When horror-movie writers run out of ideas, they can always turn to parasites. Imagine the possibilities with flesh-eating bacteria, suicide-inducing hairworms, scalp burrowing botflies--and castrating parasites. Such debilitating effects are an inevitable consequence of infection, but it is in the parasite's interest to avoid killing the host until it can transmit a new crop of pathogens.

In the "tradeoff hypothesis" for the evolution of virulence--how quickly a parasite kills its host--host exploitation and parasite reproduction are balanced to maximize the parasite's lifetime transmission success. But lifetime transmission success, an indicator of parasite fitness, has proven difficult to measure, leaving scant direct evidence for an optimal level of virulence. In a new study, Knut Helge Jensen, Dieter Ebert, and colleagues now provide empirical evidence that such a trade-off exists.

The authors worked with water fleas (Daphnia magna) and the castrating bacterium Pasteuria ramosa to investigate the relationship between parasite fitness and virulence. Castrating parasites divert resources from host reproduction toward their own reproductive ends. In the case of P. ramosa, that means generating transmission-stage parasites, or spores. In keeping with the tradeoff hypothesis, the researchers predicted that the parasite should castrate early to optimize the appropriation of host resources, and produce intermediate levels of virulence to keep the host alive long enough to maximize spore production. To determine the relationship between virulence and lifetime production of transmission-stage parasites, the researchers exposed a Daphnia clone to bacterial spores and tracked individual host mortality. Infected Daphnia sustained far more casualties than either unexposed controls or exposed but uninfected individuals, with deaths beginning at 23 days old and ending at 74 days old. (The first control died at 96 days old.) Early host death (high virulence) was bad news for P. ramosa, since the parasite needs several weeks to produce spores. But it also didn't fare terribly well with a long-lived host (low virulence), suggesting that the bacteria in these hosts grew too slowly to reach the optimal time of killing. The highest spore production was detected in Daphnia expiring at middle age, likely reflecting the benefits of using host resources for spore production--which can be impressive. One clutch of host eggs corresponds to an estimated 4.5 million P. ramosa spores, according to a recent study. Because total spore production can be used as a proxy for parasite fitness, the researchers concluded that maximum parasite fitness derives from an intermediate level of virulence.

The correlation between an optimal level of virulence and parasite fitness may result from the strong tradeoff between host and parasite fitness, the researchers explain, which emerges as these adversaries battle for the resources needed for reproduction. This experimental evidence for the long-held assumption that parasite fitness directly relates to virulence has important implications for a wide range of virulence related phenomena. Estimating likely changes in parasite virulence is essential for formulating public health strategies to contain emerging parasitic diseases and for developing effective drugs and vaccines. In future studies, the researchers plan to investigate how selection pressures, such as those caused by drugs, influence parasite fitness and cause changes in virulence.

Citation: Jensen KH, Little T, Skorping A, Ebert D (2006) Empirical support for optimal virulence in a castrating parasite. PLoS Biol 4(7): e197. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio. 0040197.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Public Library of Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Public Library of Science. "Bacterial Parasite Strives For Balance In Host Infection." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 31 May 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/05/060531094912.htm>.
Public Library of Science. (2006, May 31). Bacterial Parasite Strives For Balance In Host Infection. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/05/060531094912.htm
Public Library of Science. "Bacterial Parasite Strives For Balance In Host Infection." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/05/060531094912.htm (accessed September 30, 2014).

Share This



More Plants & Animals News

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

California University Designs Sustainable Winery

California University Designs Sustainable Winery

Reuters - US Online Video (Sep. 27, 2014) Amid California's worst drought in decades, scientists at UC Davis design a sustainable winery that includes a water recycling system. Vanessa Johnston reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Argentina Worries Over Decline of Soybean Prices

Argentina Worries Over Decline of Soybean Prices

AFP (Sep. 27, 2014) The drop in price of soy on the international market is a cause for concern in Argentina, as soybean exports are a major source of income for Latin America's third largest economy. Duration: 01:10 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Mama Bear, Cubs Hang out in California Backyard

Mama Bear, Cubs Hang out in California Backyard

Reuters - US Online Video (Sep. 27, 2014) A mama bear and her two cubs climb trees, wrestle and take naps in the backyard of a Monrovia, California home. Vanessa Johnston reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
'Crazy' Climate Forces Colombian Farmers to Adapt

'Crazy' Climate Forces Colombian Farmers to Adapt

AFP (Sep. 26, 2014) Once upon a time, farming was a blissfully low-tech business on Colombia's northern plains. Duration: 02:05 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins