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Hundreds Of Thousands Of Viral Species Present In The World's Oceans

Date:
November 7, 2006
Source:
Public Library of Science
Summary:
An extensive metagenomic survey of viral diversity in the marine environment is presented. Many phages are widely distributed, although location-specific selection results in enrichment of some viruses.

The authors used metagenomics to analyze the "viromes" of oceanic viruses and shed light on their diversity, distribution and ecosystem impact in four ocean regions around the world.
Credit: Rohwer et al. / PLoS Biology

The ocean is full of life--large, small, and microscopic. Bacteriophage (phage) viruses are minute, self-replicating bundles that alter microorganisms' genetic material and moderate their communities through predation and parasitism. Despite their small size, they are astoundingly abundant with about as many of them in a bucket full of seawater as there are humans on the planet. As a result, they can have a huge impact ecologically.

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In a new study published online this week in the open access journal PLoS Biology, Florent Angly, Forest Rohwer, and colleagues detail their metagenomic study of the diversity of bacteriophage present in water samples collected from 68 sites over 10 years from four oceanic regions (the Sargasso Sea, the Gulf of Mexico, British Columbia coastal waters, and the Arctic Ocean). They use pyrosequencing (a technique that enables collection of many DNA sequence reads for less cost than conventional sequencing) to large samples, rather than individual organisms to gain insights into diversity, geography, taxonomy, and ecosystem functioning. This approach identified tremendous viral diversity with greater than 91% of DNA sequences not present in existing databases.

Angly and colleagues analyzed the distribution of marine phages among the sampling sites and found a correlation between geographic distance and genetic distance of viral species, supporting the idea that the marine virome varies from region to region. They also investigated how similar the viromes from each location were--in fact, the differences were mostly explained by variations in relative abundance of the viral species, and supports the notion that although everything is everywhere, the environment selects.

Overall, they saw that samples from the British Columbia coast were the most genetically diverse (consistent with its nutrient-rich environment). The other three samples showed increasing diversity with decreasing latitude, a trend that parallels previous findings from terrestrial ecosystems. In fact, the researchers predict that the world's oceans hold a few hundred thousand broadly distributed viral species, with some species-rich regions likely harboring the majority of these species.

Citation: Angly F, Felts B, Breitbart M, Salamon P, Edwards R, et al. (2006) The marine viromes of four oceanic regions. PLoS Biol 4(11): e368. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio. 0040368.


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The above story is based on materials provided by Public Library of Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Public Library of Science. "Hundreds Of Thousands Of Viral Species Present In The World's Oceans." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 November 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/11/061107082949.htm>.
Public Library of Science. (2006, November 7). Hundreds Of Thousands Of Viral Species Present In The World's Oceans. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/11/061107082949.htm
Public Library of Science. "Hundreds Of Thousands Of Viral Species Present In The World's Oceans." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/11/061107082949.htm (accessed December 21, 2014).

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