Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Frog Love Song: Complex Calls Attract Females, Predators And Parasites Alike

Date:
February 11, 2007
Source:
University of Chicago Press Journals
Summary:
Why do predators and parasites eavesdropping on mating signals of their prey preferentially attack individuals producing certain types of call? Predators could use information encoded in calls to decide whom to attack.

Why do predators and parasites eavesdropping on mating signals of their prey preferentially attack individuals producing certain types of call? Predators could use information encoded in calls to decide whom to attack.

Researchers from the University of Texas at Austin and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute explored the mechanisms driving such signal preferences in predators and parasites that use túngara frog mating calls to find their prey. Their research appears in the March issue of the American Naturalist.

Male túngara frogs produce two types of calls to attract females: simple calls that consist of frequency-modulated sweeps called "whines" and complex calls that consist of whines followed by short, broadband secondary components called "chucks." Female túngara frogs, as well as unintended receivers such as frog-eating bats and blood-sucking flies, prefer complex to simple mating calls.

Bernal, Page, Rand, and Ryan tested whether bats and flies prefer complex calls because they indicate higher quality males and/or higher male density. The authors found that call complexity is not correlated with the frogs' length, mass, or body condition, and thus does not signal their quality. Complex calls, however, indicate higher abundance of prey/host. Thus increased effectiveness of attack may have played a role favoring the preference for complex calls in eavesdroppers.

Founded in 1867, The American Naturalist is one of the world's most renowned, peer-reviewed publications in ecology, evolution, and population and integrative biology research. AN emphasizes sophisticated methodologies and innovative theoretical syntheses--all in an effort to advance the knowledge of organic evolution and other broad biological principles.

Ximena E. Bernal, Rachel A. Page, A. Stanley Rand, and Michael J. Ryan, "Cues for eavesdroppers: do frog calls indicate prey density and quality?" American Naturalist 169:409-415.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Chicago Press Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Chicago Press Journals. "Frog Love Song: Complex Calls Attract Females, Predators And Parasites Alike." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 February 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/02/070210170634.htm>.
University of Chicago Press Journals. (2007, February 11). Frog Love Song: Complex Calls Attract Females, Predators And Parasites Alike. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/02/070210170634.htm
University of Chicago Press Journals. "Frog Love Song: Complex Calls Attract Females, Predators And Parasites Alike." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/02/070210170634.htm (accessed July 24, 2014).

Share This




More Plants & Animals News

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Dogs Appear To Become Jealous Of Owners' Attention

Dogs Appear To Become Jealous Of Owners' Attention

Newsy (July 23, 2014) — A U.C. San Diego researcher says jealousy isn't just a human trait, and dogs aren't the best at sharing the attention of humans with other dogs. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Professor Creates Site Revealing Where People's Cats Live

Professor Creates Site Revealing Where People's Cats Live

Newsy (July 23, 2014) — ​It's called I Know Where Your Cat Lives, and you can keep hitting the "Random Cat" button to find more real cats all over the world. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Stone Fruit Listeria Scare Causes Sweeping Recall

Stone Fruit Listeria Scare Causes Sweeping Recall

Newsy (July 22, 2014) — The Wawona Packing Company has issued a voluntary recall on the stone fruit it distributes due to a possible Listeria outbreak. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Michigan Plant's Goal: Flower and Die

Michigan Plant's Goal: Flower and Die

AP (July 22, 2014) — An 80-year-old agave plant, which is blooming for the first and only time at a University of Michigan conservatory, will die when it's done (July 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins