Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Female Chimps Keep The Bullies At Bay

Date:
March 8, 2007
Source:
Springer
Summary:
Female chimpanzees may have found a fool-proof way to ensure they mate with only the highest ranking males, namely those with important social and physical characteristics that their offspring may inherit, according to a new study. Female chimpanzees do not synchronize their reproductive activities which reduces the opportunities for less-desirable males to coerce them into mating. The findings have just been published online in Springer's journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology.

Female chimpanzees may have found a fool-proof way to ensure they mate with only the highest ranking males, namely those with important social and physical characteristics that their offspring may inherit, according to a new study1 by Akiko Matsumoto-Oda from the Department of Welfare and Culture at Okinawa University in Japan. Female chimpanzees do not synchronize their reproductive activities which reduces the opportunities for less-desirable males to coerce them into mating. The findings have just been published online in Springer’s journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology.

Related Articles


Most studies of primates to date have suggested that females synchronize their reproductive activities. However, it has been very difficult to demonstrate this analytically. Matsumoto-Oda and colleagues have developed a new index – the estrus synchrony index* - to analyze whether female chimpanzees, in the Mahale Mountains National Park in Tanzania, synchronize the fertile period of their reproductive cycles.**

The authors identified estrus in females by the size of their anogenital swellings, which is related to increased levels of follicular estrogen. The period of maximal swelling was regarded as the ‘estrous period’ because almost all copulations were observed in this phase. In the analysis of the data covering nine years of observations, the authors looked at whether or not females displayed a significant tendency to synchronize their estrous cycles.

Commenting on these findings, the authors suggest that “avoiding synchronizing estrous cycles may be a female strategy to reduce male sexual coercion.”

Indeed, male chimpanzees use coercive tactics such as physical aggression against females, forced copulation, harassment and intimidation to increase their reproductive success. The opportunity for males to coerce females is reduced when females avoid synchronizing their estrous cycles, because with fewer females in estrous at the same time, mating competition between males intensifies. As a result, there is an increased probability that high-ranking males, with desirable social and physical attributes, will mate with the fertile females. These sought-after characteristics could be inherited by their offspring.

* The estrus synchrony index (ESI) is the variance in the proportion of females with maximal swellings to cycling females observed per day. ESI values are large when females synchronize their estrous cycles and are small when they avoid synchronizing.

** The tendency of individuals to undergo the fertile period of the sexual cycle at the same time as other members of the population is known as estrous synchrony.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Springer. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Springer. "Female Chimps Keep The Bullies At Bay." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 March 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/070307101420.htm>.
Springer. (2007, March 8). Female Chimps Keep The Bullies At Bay. ScienceDaily. Retrieved February 28, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/070307101420.htm
Springer. "Female Chimps Keep The Bullies At Bay." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/070307101420.htm (accessed February 28, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Plants & Animals News

Saturday, February 28, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

The Best Drinks for Your Health

The Best Drinks for Your Health

Buzz60 (Feb. 27, 2015) When it comes to health and fitness, there&apos;s lots of talk about what foods to eat, but there are a few liquids that can promote good nutrition. Krystin Goodwin (@krystingoodwin) has the healthiest drinks to boost your health! Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Cherries, Snap Peas and More Tasty Spring Produce

Cherries, Snap Peas and More Tasty Spring Produce

Buzz60 (Feb. 27, 2015) From sweet cherries to sugar snap peas, spring is the peak season for some of the tastiest and healthiest produce. Krystin Goodwin (@Krystingoodwin) has the best seasonal fruits and veggies to spring in to good health! Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Best Foods to Battle Stress

The Best Foods to Battle Stress

Buzz60 (Feb. 26, 2015) If you&apos;re dealing with anxiety, there are a few foods that can help. Krystin Goodwin (@krystingoodwin) has the best foods to tame stress. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Amazon Keeps Its Green Thanks To The Sahara Desert

The Amazon Keeps Its Green Thanks To The Sahara Desert

Newsy (Feb. 25, 2015) Satellite data shows the Amazon rainforest supports its lush flora with a little help from Sahara Desert dust. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins