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New Water Filtration Materials Help Assure Safe Drinking Water

Date:
April 24, 2007
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
A new generation of water filtration materials is enabling municipalities and industries in the United States and water-short countries overseas to produce safe drinking water from supplies contaminated with salts and other undesirable compounds, according to a new article.

A new generation of water filtration materials is enabling municipalities and industries in the United States and water-short countries overseas to produce safe drinking water from supplies contaminated with salts and other undesirable compounds, according to an article scheduled for the April 23 issue of Chemical & Engineering News, ACS' weekly news magazine.

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In the article, C&EN senior editor Marc S. Reisch explains that the technology -- termed membrane filtration -- also removes bacteria and chlorine-resistant parasites such as Cryptosporidium and Giardia. Starting with highly contaminated water, membrane filtration can produce potable water that can be purer than water from pristine reservoirs or deep artesian wells, the article notes.

Reisch describes a growing market for membrane filtration in Florida, Texas, California and other locales that must treat brackish water. Much of the demand in the United States results from increasingly stringent Federal regulations for drinking water drawn from surface sources. Demand for the technology also is strong abroad, especially in areas such as the Middle East that face severe water shortages and produce drinking water by desalination of sea water. A related C&EN story focuses on global chemical industry efforts to make safe, secure sources of drinking water more widely available.

Article: "Filtering out the bad stuff: Polymeric membranes are increasingly being used to clean up water for drinking and industrial use"


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "New Water Filtration Materials Help Assure Safe Drinking Water." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 April 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/04/070423100657.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2007, April 24). New Water Filtration Materials Help Assure Safe Drinking Water. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/04/070423100657.htm
American Chemical Society. "New Water Filtration Materials Help Assure Safe Drinking Water." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/04/070423100657.htm (accessed October 30, 2014).

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