Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Lightning Strikes Deadliest In Summer

Date:
June 29, 2007
Source:
University of Illinois at Chicago
Summary:
Lightning strikes were responsible for 47 confirmed deaths and 246 confirmed injuries last year, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and summer is the peak season for lightning-related injuries.

Multiple cloud-to-ground and cloud-to-cloud lightning strokes during night-time. Observed during night-time thunderstorm.
Credit: C. Clark, NOAA Photo Library

Lightning strikes were responsible for 47 confirmed deaths and 246 confirmed injuries last year, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and summer is the peak season for lightning-related injuries.

Related Articles


The Fourth of July is a particularly deadly time because so many people are outdoors, says Dr. Mary Ann Cooper, professor of emergency medicine and director of the lightning injury research program at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Most people seriously underestimate the risk of being struck by lightning and do not know when or where to take shelter.

"Decisions about lightning safety must be made by the individual, but education can help people reduce their chances of being struck by lightning," Cooper said.

"Even though the vast majority of those struck by lightning survive, they frequently have permanent after effects, which can include chronic pain, brain injury and thought-processing problems," said Cooper, considered by many to be the leading international expert on lightning strike injuries.

Here are some safety tips to help protect yourself from lightning strikes, courtesy of Cooper, NOAA and the National Weather Service.

"When planning outdoor activities, know what shelter is available and where to go if you hear thunder," Cooper said. When you hear thunder, go indoors immediately. Head for a house, school or large building.

"The rule is, 'when thunder roars, go indoors,'" Cooper said. If you can't get indoors, get into a hardtop car, bus or truck. Never go under a tree.

Stay off phones, computers and video games. "Surprisingly, hard-wired phone use is the leading cause of indoor lightning injuries in the United States," Cooper said. Cell phones are quite safe, aside from distracting someone from seeking safety.

Lightning can hurt you even before it begins to rain and can strike as far as 10 miles away from the rain area of a thunderstorm. "Wait 30 minutes after the last crack of thunder or flash of lightning before resuming activities or driving home," Cooper said.

During Lightning Safety Awareness Week, June 24-30, NOAA and the National Weather Service this year are highlighting safety awareness for children, with handouts, posters and outdoor risk-reduction tips.

"If we can teach children to be safe around lightning, we can change behavior forever -- and I can put myself out of a job," said Cooper, who also is an American Meteorological Society fellow and works closely with the National Weather Service in its annual education program.

More information about lightning and lighting safety is available at http://www.lightningsafety.noaa.gov.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Illinois at Chicago. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Illinois at Chicago. "Lightning Strikes Deadliest In Summer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 June 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/06/070627135401.htm>.
University of Illinois at Chicago. (2007, June 29). Lightning Strikes Deadliest In Summer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/06/070627135401.htm
University of Illinois at Chicago. "Lightning Strikes Deadliest In Summer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/06/070627135401.htm (accessed October 24, 2014).

Share This



More Earth & Climate News

Friday, October 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Dances With Wolves in China's Wild West

Dances With Wolves in China's Wild West

AFP (Oct. 23, 2014) One man is on a mission to boost the population of wolves in China's violence-wracked far west. The animal - symbol of the Uighur minority there - is under threat with a massive human resettlement program in the region. Duration: 00:41 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
San Diego Zoo's White Rhinos Provide Hope for the Critically Endangered Species

San Diego Zoo's White Rhinos Provide Hope for the Critically Endangered Species

Reuters - Light News Video Online (Oct. 22, 2014) The pair of rare white northern rhinos bring hope for their species as only six remain in the world. Elly Park reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Trick-or-Treating Banned Because of Polar Bears

Trick-or-Treating Banned Because of Polar Bears

Buzz60 (Oct. 21, 2014) Mother Nature is pulling a trick on the kids of Arviat, Canada. As Mara Montalbano (@maramontalbano) tells us, the effects of global warming caused the town to ban trick-or-treating this Halloween. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Traditional Farming Methods Gaining Ground in Mali

Traditional Farming Methods Gaining Ground in Mali

AFP (Oct. 20, 2014) He is leading a one man agricultural revolution in Mali - Oumar Diatabe uses traditional farming methods to get the most out of his land and is teaching others across the country how to do the same. Duration: 01:44 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins