Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Gambling Addiction Assessment Tool Applies Equally For Different Races

Date:
August 26, 2007
Source:
Washington University in St. Louis
Summary:
A researcher has lead the development and testing of a new assessment tool that will determine the reliability of current pathological gambling disorder criteria equally well for Caucasian and African-American gamblers.

"With African-Americans and other minority groups having both problem and pathological gambling rates that are 2-3 times higher than Caucasian gamblers, accurate diagnosis is essential to treat gambling addiction," says Renee Cunningham-Williams, Ph.D., a leading gambling addictions expert and visiting associate professor of social work at Washington University in St. Louis. Unfortunately, as with other mental health disorders, African-American and other minority groups receive disparate care from symptom recognition and diagnosis through treatment.

In a first step to close this gap in care, Cunningham-Williams successfully led the development and testing of a new assessment tool, the Gambling Assessment Module (GAM), to determine the reliability of current pathological gambling disorder (PGD) criteria. Cunningham-Williams' findings in the July issue of the Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease show that the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM)'s current criteria for PGD (DSM-IV), when assessed through the GAM, has substantial reliability. The PGD diagnosis applies equally well for Caucasians and African Americans and for game-specific disorders after adjusting for age and social class differences.

According to Cunningham-Williams, although early results are promising, more research is required to definitively conclude that the DSM-IV or earlier established DSM criteria, in conjunction with the GAM, are a reliable tool for diagnosing racial/ethnic minorities.

"The DSM, as operationalized through the GAM, appears to be a useful first step in addressing racial/ethnic disparities in this disorder," she says. "In order to appropriately plan for treatment, clinicians must be confident in their abilities to reliably diagnose this disorder. Our research is a first step in helping clinicians achieve that confidence."

The GAM is the only existing instrument that diagnoses problem gambling across both the American Psychiatric Association's and the World Health Organization's criteria. It also is the only assessment in the world that can determine a diagnosis that is specific to the game a person plays.

"A person may play the slots, cards and the horses and be a pathological gambler, but experiences the symptoms only for slot machines," Cunningham-Williams says. "This is similar to a drug user, who uses several drugs, but only meets the criteria for cocaine dependence."

In this study, Cunningham-Williams and colleagues asked Caucasians and African-Americans about their gambling behaviors while carefully controlling for potential study biases. Two separate interviewers asked gamblers about their gambling behaviors in the exact same way, in two separate telephone interviews held about one week apart.

"When discrepancies in responses between the two time periods were evident, they occurred infrequently and were not due to racial/ethnic variation," she says.

Cunningham-Williams' current research focuses on the various behavioral treatments for this disorder, the important ethnic and cultural factors that may influence gambling behavior, and how gambling addiction is associated with other mental health and substance use disorders among adolescents, young adults and older Americans.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Washington University in St. Louis. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Washington University in St. Louis. "Gambling Addiction Assessment Tool Applies Equally For Different Races." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 August 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070824095816.htm>.
Washington University in St. Louis. (2007, August 26). Gambling Addiction Assessment Tool Applies Equally For Different Races. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070824095816.htm
Washington University in St. Louis. "Gambling Addiction Assessment Tool Applies Equally For Different Races." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070824095816.htm (accessed October 22, 2014).

Share This



More Mind & Brain News

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

First-Of-Its-Kind Treatment Gives Man Ability To Walk Again

First-Of-Its-Kind Treatment Gives Man Ability To Walk Again

Newsy (Oct. 21, 2014) A medical team has for the first time given a man the ability to walk again after transplanting cells from his brain onto his severed spinal cord. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Portable Breathalyzer Gets You Home Safely

Portable Breathalyzer Gets You Home Safely

Buzz60 (Oct. 21, 2014) Breeze, a portable breathalyzer, gets you home safely by instantly showing your blood alcohol content, and with one tap, lets you call an Uber, a cab or a friend from your contact list to pick you up. Sean Dowling (@SeanDowlingTV) has the details. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Your Birth Season Might Determine Your Temperament

Your Birth Season Might Determine Your Temperament

Newsy (Oct. 20, 2014) A new study says the season you're born in can determine your temperament — and one season has a surprising outcome. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Movies Might Desensitize Violence For Parents, Not Just Kids

Movies Might Desensitize Violence For Parents, Not Just Kids

Newsy (Oct. 20, 2014) A study suggests that parents become desensitized to violent movies as well as children, which leads them to allow their kids to view violent films. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins