Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

'Killer Bees' Now Established In New Orleans

Date:
September 13, 2007
Source:
Louisiana Department of Agriculture & Forestry
Summary:
Africanized honeybees, 'killer bees' have been found in the New Orleans area since July of 2005, but the regularity and frequency of finding them there is new cause for concern. Another confirmed positive Africanized honeybee sample in the New Orleans area indicates the bees are most likely established there now, according to the Agriculture and Forestry Commissioner.

It is extremely difficult to distinguish the Africanized Honeybee from European Honeybees by appearance alone. Only after complex laboratory analysis of morphological characters is it possible to state the probability that a group of bees is Africanized.
Credit: California Department of Food and Agriculture

Africanized honeybees have been found in the New Orleans area since July of 2005, but the regularity and frequency of finding them there is new cause for concern.

Another confirmed positive Africanized honeybee sample in the New Orleans area indicates the bees are most likely established there now, Agriculture and Forestry Commissioner Bob Odom said.

The positive sample was found in a trap along the Mississippi River in St. Bernard Parish about five miles downriver from a confirmed find earlier this year. The location is about one mile south of Meraux and two miles southeast of Chalmette.

“In January, a colony of Africanized honeybees was found in a St. Bernard Parish house being torn down because of damage from Hurricane Katrina. The proximity of this find indicates the bees could be a swarm from that colony or could be from a ship or barge passing by on the river,” Odom said. “Although the exact source can’t be identified, we have to assume Africanized honeybees are now established in the area and people should be careful when working outside.”

The Department of Agriculture and Forestry maintains Africanized honeybee traps along a north-south corridor through the state and at all deepwater ports. These traps will continue to be utilized in monitoring the progression of Africanized honeybees across the state.

So far this year, LDAF’s New Orleans District has collected 40 samples from traps near the Mississippi River and the port. Five of the samples were sent to the USDA for further confirmation. Of those, three were negative, one was positive and one is pending results.

Africanized bees are smaller and more aggressive than the European honeybees commonly raised for honey production. Their hostile nature concerns many outdoor enthusiasts.

“Because Africanized bees have been labeled ‘killer bees’ for years, there’s an idea around that they are bigger than European honeybees,” Odom said. “The truth is they’re actually smaller but a lot fiercer.”

The venom in Africanized bees is the same as that in European bees, but Africanized bees will sting in greater numbers leading to a toxic reaction in some cases. Experts recommend seeking cover immediately to reduce the number of stings in a confrontation with Africanized bees.

Africanized honeybees were first discovered in Louisiana in July 2005 when LDAF received notification from USDA that samples sent to the national bee lab in Tucson, Ariz., were confirmed as the Africanized variety. The samples were taken in June 2005 from a swarm of bees found in a trap near the town of Rodessa in north Caddo Parish. It was the first case of Africanized bees moving into the state through natural range expansion. Since then, they have steadily moved east through the state most recently being confirmed near Pecan Island and Turkey Creek.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Louisiana Department of Agriculture & Forestry. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Louisiana Department of Agriculture & Forestry. "'Killer Bees' Now Established In New Orleans." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 September 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070912142432.htm>.
Louisiana Department of Agriculture & Forestry. (2007, September 13). 'Killer Bees' Now Established In New Orleans. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070912142432.htm
Louisiana Department of Agriculture & Forestry. "'Killer Bees' Now Established In New Orleans." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070912142432.htm (accessed July 24, 2014).

Share This




More Plants & Animals News

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Stone Fruit Listeria Scare Causes Sweeping Recall

Stone Fruit Listeria Scare Causes Sweeping Recall

Newsy (July 22, 2014) The Wawona Packing Company has issued a voluntary recall on the stone fruit it distributes due to a possible Listeria outbreak. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Michigan Plant's Goal: Flower and Die

Michigan Plant's Goal: Flower and Die

AP (July 22, 2014) An 80-year-old agave plant, which is blooming for the first and only time at a University of Michigan conservatory, will die when it's done (July 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Huge Schizophrenia Study Finds Dozens Of New Genetic Causes

Huge Schizophrenia Study Finds Dozens Of New Genetic Causes

Newsy (July 22, 2014) The 83 new genetic markers could open dozens of new avenues for schizophrenia treatment research. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
CDC Head Concerned About a Post-Antibiotic Era

CDC Head Concerned About a Post-Antibiotic Era

AP (July 22, 2014) Sounding alarms about the growing threat of antibiotic resistance, CDC Director Tom Frieden warned Tuesday if the global community does not confront the problem soon, the world will be living in a devastating post-antibiotic era. (July 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins