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Dealing With Wind Variability On The Wind Farm

Date:
October 24, 2007
Source:
University of Texas at Austin
Summary:
As Texas' electric grid operator prepares to add power lines for carrying future wind-generated energy, an electrical engineer at is developing improved methods for determining the extent to which power from a wind farm can displace a conventional power plant, and how best to regulate varying wind power.

Dr. Santoso holds a 500-watt turbine used for small household applications such as a water pump, refrigerator, or other such small electronic devices. Energy generated by this size of turbine is stored in a battery. A photo of the Siemens wind turbine at King Mountain Wind Ranch in McCamey, TX is in the background. These towers can measure up to 68 meters in height, with blades as long as 30 meters, generating 1 to 2 megawatts (million watts) of power.
Credit: Photo by Erin McCarley

As Texas’ electric grid operator prepares to add power lines for carrying future wind-generated energy, an electrical engineer at The University of Texas at Austin is developing improved methods for determining the extent to which power from a wind farm can displace a conventional power plant, and how best to regulate varying wind power.

“The cost of wind energy has become competitive with that of energy from fossil fuels because of technology improvements,” said Assistant Professor Surya Santoso. “Unfortunately, electric power generated from wind energy is intermittent and variable. That means we need to have better measurements of wind power plants’ output as we integrate wind energy into existing power systems. We also need to develop a way of managing wind power so it can be more readily called upon when needed.”

Texas has outstripped California since 2006 as the leading national producer of wind power, with most of the state’s renewable energy goal by 2025 focused on wind power. To help meet this goal, the state’s Electric Reliability Council of Texas is expected to add about 1,500 megawatts of new wind generation this year alone. In late September, Texas also awarded four offshore tracts along the Gulf Coast for wind power projects with a generating capacity of 1,150 megawatts.

Santoso is developing two strategies to manage and overcome the intermittent and variable behavior of wind power. With a two-year, $200,000 grant from the National Science Foundation, he and his students are developing computational methods to measure the actual capacity contribution of wind farms. This will allow system planners to calculate how much a wind farm can contribute to meeting expected power needs.

Santoso’s lab is also using the funding to establish the technical requirements of energy storage systems that would serve as temporary ”batteries” for releasing stored wind energy at optimal times.

“Having a proper energy storage system would allow you to harness free wind when it’s available, but release that energy at the time of your choosing with a desired power profile,” Santoso said. He noted that a wind energy storage system would also increase wind farms’ overall capacity contribution and reduce the likelihood of overloading transmission power lines that must carry energy from different power sources.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Texas at Austin. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Texas at Austin. "Dealing With Wind Variability On The Wind Farm." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 October 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071019184844.htm>.
University of Texas at Austin. (2007, October 24). Dealing With Wind Variability On The Wind Farm. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071019184844.htm
University of Texas at Austin. "Dealing With Wind Variability On The Wind Farm." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071019184844.htm (accessed August 30, 2014).

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