Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

'Mini Transplant' Patients' Outcomes Similar Using Related And Unrelated Donor Cells

Date:
December 8, 2007
Source:
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
Summary:
People who undergo nonmyeloablative stem-cell transplants, or 'mini transplants,' for leukemia, lymphoma and other blood cancers have comparable outcomes regardless of whether they receive tissue-matched stem cells from a related or unrelated donor, according to new findings.

People who undergo nonmyeloablative stem-cell transplants, or "mini transplants," for leukemia, lymphoma and other blood cancers have comparable outcomes regardless of whether they receive tissue-matched stem cells from a related or unrelated donor, according to new findings by researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

Related Articles


The research by Marco Mielcarek, M.D., and colleagues in the Hutchinson Center's Clinical Research Division appear in the December issue of the journal Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

"The main message for referring physicians is that if the patient is a candidate for a nonmyeloablative, or mini, transplant but does not have a suitable related donor, the transplant should not be delayed provided a matched unrelated donor is available," said Mielcarek, the lead author of the paper.

This is a significant finding because historically, "standard" (myeloablative) stem-cell transplants from unrelated matched donors have been associated with increased risk of non-relapse mortality and decreased overall survival compared to transplants from matched related donors. Only 30 percent of patients with hematologic malignancies who might benefit from a stem-cell transplant have a matched related donor.

The combination of immunosuppressive drugs and the unique biology of the mini transplant may be the reasons behind the research results, Mielcarek said.

The Hutchinson Center's pioneering development 10 years ago of the mini transplant, a kinder, gentler treatment that doesn't require the intensive radiation and chemotherapy associated with standard stem-cell transplants, made the therapy available to thousands of older patients who were medically unable to withstand the rigors of traditional transplantation.

Such transplants do not require a patient's marrow be destroyed with high-dose radiation and chemotherapy prior to the infusion of donor cells. The technique involves minimal radiation and substantially reduced side effects. The procedure often can be performed in an outpatient clinic.

Mielcarek and colleagues conducted a retrospective study of 221 patients who had matched related donors and 184 patients who had matched unrelated donors. All of the patients underwent mini transplants at the Hutchinson Center between December 1997 and June 2006. After adjusting for confounding factors such as comorbidities, relapse risk, patient age, stem-cell source, preparative regimen, and sex mismatch of donor and recipient, researchers found no statistically significant differences between patients who received unrelated and related matched donor cells in terms of rates of non-relapse mortality, relapse-related or overall mortality. Additionally, overall rates of severe acute and extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease between the two groups were not significantly different.

The preparative regimen for and the immunobiology of nonmyeloablative transplantation may account for the similar outcomes, according to the study. Patients who undergo mini transplants receive potent pre- and post-transplant immunosuppression drugs. This allows a major reduction in pre-transplant chemotherapy without compromising engraftment of the donor cells.

The paper was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health.

The research paper is entitled "Comparable Outcomes after Nonmyeloablative Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation with Unrelated and Related Donors."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. "'Mini Transplant' Patients' Outcomes Similar Using Related And Unrelated Donor Cells." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 December 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071203103355.htm>.
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. (2007, December 8). 'Mini Transplant' Patients' Outcomes Similar Using Related And Unrelated Donor Cells. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071203103355.htm
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. "'Mini Transplant' Patients' Outcomes Similar Using Related And Unrelated Donor Cells." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071203103355.htm (accessed December 21, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, December 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Touch-Free Smart Phone Empowers Mobility-Impaired

Touch-Free Smart Phone Empowers Mobility-Impaired

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 21, 2014) A touch-free phone developed in Israel enables the mobility-impaired to operate smart phones with just a movement of the head. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Earthworms Provide Cancer-Fighting Bacteria

Earthworms Provide Cancer-Fighting Bacteria

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 21, 2014) Polish scientists isolate bacteria from earthworm intestines which they say may be used in antibiotics and cancer treatments. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Existing Chemical Compounds Could Revive Failing Antibiotics, Says Danish Scientist

Existing Chemical Compounds Could Revive Failing Antibiotics, Says Danish Scientist

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 21, 2014) A team of scientists led by Danish chemist Jorn Christensen says they have isolated two chemical compounds within an existing antipsychotic medication that could be used to help a range of failing antibiotics work against killer bacterial infections, such as Tuberculosis. Jim Drury went to meet him. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Hugging It Out Could Help You Ward Off A Cold

Hugging It Out Could Help You Ward Off A Cold

Newsy (Dec. 21, 2014) Carnegie Mellon researchers found frequent hugs can help people avoid stress-related illnesses. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins