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Chemical In Red Wine, Fruits And Vegetables Counters Unhealthy Effects Of High-fat Foods

Date:
January 6, 2008
Source:
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Summary:
Just as additives help gasoline burn cleaner, a research report shows that the food industry could take a similar approach toward reducing health risks associated with fatty foods. These "meal additives" would be based on work of researchers who discovered that consuming polyphenols (natural compounds in red wine, fruits, and vegetables) simultaneously with high-fat foods may reduce health risks associated with these foods.

Consuming polyphenols (natural compounds in red wine, fruits, and vegetables) while eating high-fat foods may reduce health risks associated with high fat foods.
Credit: iStockphoto/Diane Diederich

Just as additives help gasoline burn cleaner, a new research report shows that the food industry could take a similar approach toward reducing health risks associated with fatty foods. These "meal additives" would be based on work of Israeli researchers who discovered that consuming polyphenols (natural compounds in red wine, fruits, and vegetables) simultaneously with high-fat foods may reduce health risks associated with these foods.

"We suggest a new hypothesis to explain polyphenols," said Joseph Kanner, senior author of the report. "For the first time, these compounds were demonstrated to prevent significantly the appearance of toxic food derivative compounds in human plasma."

For the study, six men and four women were fed three different meals consisting of dark meat turkey cutlets. One meal, the control, consisted of turkey meat and water. The second meal consisted of turkey meat with polyphenols added after cooking (one tablespoon of concentrated wine) followed with a glass of red wine (about 7 ounces). The third meal consisted of turkey meat with polyphenols added before cooking and then followed by a glass of wine.

At various points during the study, researchers took blood and urine samples to measure levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), a natural byproduct of fat digestion known to increase the risk for heart disease and other chronic conditions. The researchers found that MDA levels nearly quintupled after the control meal, while MDA was nearly eliminated after subjects consumed the meals with polyphenols.

"As long as deep fried candy bars are on menus, scientists will need to keep serving up new ways to prevent the cellular damage caused by these very tasty treats," said Gerald Weissmann, MD, Editor-in-Chief of The FASEB Journal. "This study suggests that the time will come where people can eat french fries without plugging their arteries."

This research was published in the January 2008 print issue of The FASEB Journal.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. "Chemical In Red Wine, Fruits And Vegetables Counters Unhealthy Effects Of High-fat Foods." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 January 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080102083757.htm>.
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. (2008, January 6). Chemical In Red Wine, Fruits And Vegetables Counters Unhealthy Effects Of High-fat Foods. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080102083757.htm
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. "Chemical In Red Wine, Fruits And Vegetables Counters Unhealthy Effects Of High-fat Foods." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080102083757.htm (accessed October 2, 2014).

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