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Europe Should Adopt WHO Recommendations For Particulate Matter Cuts, Experts Urge

Date:
January 22, 2008
Source:
BMJ-British Medical Journal
Summary:
Europe must adopt the World Health Organization standard on fine particulate matter pollution if it is to significantly curb needless premature deaths, concludes new research. Fine particulate matter has been associated with an increase in death from all causes, and particularly respiratory and cardiovascular diseases.

Europe must adopt the World Health Organization (WHO) standard on fine particulate matter pollution if it is to significantly curb needless premature deaths, concludes research in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Europe wants to cap average levels of fine particulate matter pollution (PM2.5) at 20 g/m 3 by 2010. But the equivalent standard recommended by the US Environmental Protection Agency is 15 g/m 3, while that recommended by the World Health Organization is 10 g/m 3 .

Fine particulate matter has been associated with an increase in death from all causes, and particularly respiratory and cardiovascular diseases.

Using validated data on health outcomes and exposure to pollution for 26 European cities, covering more than 40 million inhabitants, the researchers calculated the expected number of deaths that could be delayed for all three standards.

Estimated average annual levels of fine particulate matter ranged from 17 to 61 g/m3. London and Dublin were the cleanest of the 26 cities, with levels below 10 /m 3. Athens in Greece, Cracow in Poland, and the Italian capital Rome were among the worst offenders, with levels above 25 g/m 3.

The calculations showed that reducing average levels to15 g/m 3 could delay at least 1.6% of premature deaths among those aged 30 and above, a rate four times greater than could be achieved by levels of 25 g/m 3 and two times greater than could be achieved at 20 g/m 3.

But cutting levels to 10 g/m 3, as recommended by the WHO, could produce a fall in early deaths that would be seven times greater, the calculations suggest.

Every city, but London and Dublin would benefit, say the authors, with reductions in premature deaths ranging from 0.8% to 9%, and 80% of thisl could be achieved within five years.

The authors point out that it is not just lives that would be saved.

The US Environmental Protection Agency has estimated that meeting an annual standards of 5 g/m 3 would save between US$20 and 160 billion every year. "It is clear that reducing air pollution levels is not an easy task," say the authors. "But the health and economic benefits have been proved."

Meeting the US or WHO air quality standards "would substantially reduce mortality in European cities," they say, but "the political willpower is needed," they warn.


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The above story is based on materials provided by BMJ-British Medical Journal. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

BMJ-British Medical Journal. "Europe Should Adopt WHO Recommendations For Particulate Matter Cuts, Experts Urge." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 January 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080117102119.htm>.
BMJ-British Medical Journal. (2008, January 22). Europe Should Adopt WHO Recommendations For Particulate Matter Cuts, Experts Urge. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080117102119.htm
BMJ-British Medical Journal. "Europe Should Adopt WHO Recommendations For Particulate Matter Cuts, Experts Urge." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080117102119.htm (accessed October 24, 2014).

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