Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Resilience Science Is Promising Approach To Marine Conservation

Date:
February 23, 2008
Source:
Brown University
Summary:
The fast-growing field of resilience science can produce more effective ocean protection policies than previous models. Resilience science is the study of how ecosystems resist and respond to disturbances, both natural and man-made. This increasingly influential area of environmental science is affecting marine conservation efforts from the Gulf of Maine to the Great Barrier Reef.

Ocean ecosystems are increasingly threatened by overfishing, pollution, habitat loss, climate change and coastal development. Understanding why some ecosystems resist these shocks, and continue to deliver benefits such as plentiful fish and pristine beaches, and how others collapse is the subject of resilience science.
Credit: iStockphoto/Ian Scott

Brown University marine conservation scientist Heather Leslie has explained how the fast-growing field of resilience science can produce more effective ocean protection policies at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.*

Resilience science is the study of how ecosystems resist and respond to disturbances, both natural and man-made. This increasingly influential area of environmental science is affecting marine conservation efforts from the Gulf of Maine to the Great Barrier Reef.

Ocean ecosystems are increasingly threatened by overfishing, pollution, habitat loss, climate change and coastal development. Understanding why some ecosystems resist these shocks, and continue to deliver benefits such as plentiful fish and pristine beaches, and how others collapse is the subject of resilience science -- a budding branch of study that combines approaches from both the life and social sciences.

"Resilience science examines how human and natural forces come together to affect an ecosystem's ability to resist, recover or adapt to disturbances," Leslie said. "That knowledge can be directly applied to conservation policies -- policies that can better protect the oceans."

Key elements of resilience science include the recognition of the connections between marine systems and human communities, the maintenance of diversity in marine ecosystems and economies, and the importance of monitoring of the dynamic ecological processes, such as the rate of plankton production in the upper ocean, that create large-scale ecological patterns.

Conservation policies based on resilience science are showing promise around the world and across the United States, most notably in the Chesapeake Bay. Restoration of the Bay is underway -- evidenced by oyster sanctuaries and eelgrass seeding -- to restore lost diversity and increase future resilience.

"Viewing the world through a resilience lens means embracing change and acknowledging the tight connections between humans and nature," Leslie said. "The way forward will require embracing change at many levels -- in societal expectations, in business practices, in resource management -- to adapt to an ever-changing environment. Resilience science can show the way for-ward, creating more robust marine ecosystems and thriving human communities."

*Heather Leslie, Sharpe Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies and Biology at Brown University, presented the symposium "Embracing Change: A New Vision for Management in Coastal Marine Ecosystems" on Feb. 17, 2008.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Brown University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Brown University. "Resilience Science Is Promising Approach To Marine Conservation." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 February 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080217102153.htm>.
Brown University. (2008, February 23). Resilience Science Is Promising Approach To Marine Conservation. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080217102153.htm
Brown University. "Resilience Science Is Promising Approach To Marine Conservation." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080217102153.htm (accessed July 26, 2014).

Share This




More Earth & Climate News

Saturday, July 26, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Virginia Governor Tours Tornado Aftermath

Virginia Governor Tours Tornado Aftermath

AP (July 25, 2014) Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe toured the Cherrystone Family Camping and RV Resort on the Chesapeake Bay today, a day after it was hit by a tornado. The storm claimed two lives and injured dozens of others. (July 25) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Europe's Highest Train Turns 80 in French Pyrenees

Europe's Highest Train Turns 80 in French Pyrenees

AFP (July 25, 2014) Europe's highest train, the little train of Artouste in the French Pyrenees, celebrates its 80th birthday. Duration: 01:05 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Goma Cheese Brings Whiff of New Hope to DRC

Goma Cheese Brings Whiff of New Hope to DRC

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 24, 2014) The eastern region of the Democratic Republic of Congo, mainly known for conflict and instability, is an unlikely place for the production of fine cheese. But a farm in the village of Masisi, in North Kivu is slowly transforming perceptions of the area. Known simply as Goma cheese, the Congolese version of Dutch gouda has gained popularity through out the region. Ciara Sutton reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Bill Gates: Health, Agriculture Key to Africa's Development

Bill Gates: Health, Agriculture Key to Africa's Development

AFP (July 24, 2014) Health and agriculture development are key if African countries are to overcome poverty and grow, US software billionaire Bill Gates said Thursday, as he received an honourary degree in Ethiopia. Duration: 00:36 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins