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Tiny Bug Found In Grand Canyon Region Cave Suggests Big Biodiversity

Date:
April 8, 2008
Source:
North Arizona University
Summary:
The discovery of a new genus of a tiny booklouse from a northern Arizona cave may lead to further protection for cave ecosystems. This is the third new genus of invertebrates found by the same two scientists since 2006. They discovered a new cricket genus and a new millipede genus in Grand Canyon region caves.

This tiny arthropod, measuring only 1.3 mm (smaller than a grain of rice), has hardened forewings similar to that of the outer hardwing cover of beetles.
Credit: Ed Mockford, Illinois State University, Normal, Illinois

The discovery of a new genus of a tiny booklouse from a northern Arizona cave may lead to further protection for cave ecosystems.

J. Judson Wynne, a Northern Arizona University doctoral student and cave research scientist with the U.S. Geological Survey's Southwest Biological Science Center, and Kyle Voyles, a cave researcher from Parashant National Monument, recently discovered a new genus of psocopteran (booklouse) from a cave on the western edge of the Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument.

This discovery represents only the third known living genera in the Family Sphaeropsocopsis. There are two other genera, which are known from fossils in amber dating back to early Cretaceous Period around 125 million years ago. Whether this finding represents a relict species researchers cannot yet say. It will require further investigation to discover if this is a species that has survived while other related ones have become extinct.

This is the third new genus of invertebrates found by the two scientists since 2006. Wynne and Voyles discovered a new cricket genus and a new millipede genus in Grand Canyon region caves. They also have unearthed 15 new insect species from Grand Canyon region caves.

"I am hopeful these findings will help cave ecosystems get a seat at the conservation table," Wynne said. "We want to see cave ecosystems factored into regional conservation management planning."

Edward Mockford, a taxonomist from Illinois State University, will soon release a name for the new genus. He said the booklouse is from the family Sphaeropsocopsis, but is distinguished from other genera by its unusual wing structure.

"In the past, very little attention was given to cave ecosystems," Voyles said. "It was thought that caves couldn't contain a significant biodiversity, so they were mostly ignored. These newly discovered ecosystems are now the principal management concern for these caves and will no longer being ignored."

Wynne said that this discovery of another new genus living in a fragile cave ecosystem may help scientists begin to piece together the unique biodiversity and communities that caves often support.

"Now that we have another new genus discovery, land managers are beginning to recognize the importance of cave ecosystems," Wynne explained. "We are working with them on developing biodiversity inventory and monitoring strategies, and ways to monitor visitor impacts."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by North Arizona University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

North Arizona University. "Tiny Bug Found In Grand Canyon Region Cave Suggests Big Biodiversity." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 April 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/04/080404131211.htm>.
North Arizona University. (2008, April 8). Tiny Bug Found In Grand Canyon Region Cave Suggests Big Biodiversity. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/04/080404131211.htm
North Arizona University. "Tiny Bug Found In Grand Canyon Region Cave Suggests Big Biodiversity." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/04/080404131211.htm (accessed September 22, 2014).

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