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New Method Identifies Rat Poison In Humans

Date:
May 28, 2008
Source:
Norwegian Institute of Public Health
Summary:
Researchers have developed a method to identify bromadiolone poisoning in humans. Bromadiolone is a rat poison that can be purchased freely in shops. A number of cases have been reported internationally where people have been poisoned, with a mortality rate of 20 percent.

Researchers at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health (NIPH) have developed a method to identify bromadiolone poisoning in humans.Bromadiolone is a rat poison that can be purchased freely in shops.Anumber of cases have been reported internationally where people have been poisoned, with a mortality rate of 20 percent.

Blood-thinning substances have been used for many years as rodenticides. Warfarin was previously usedbut due to resistance development, the so-called super-warfarins were introduced. These substances are 100 times as potent as warfarin.

A commonly used super-warfarin is bromadiolone (sold as the brand name Temus in Norway). Few laboratories have been able to prove the presence of bromadiolone in human samples and little is known what happens to the substance in the human body.

Now researchers at the NIPH have developed an analysis method to spot the presence of bromadiolone. The cause of serious bleeding disturbances in a female patient wasinvestigated during a recent poisoning case. It appeared that the woman had been exposed to blood-thinning substances. Blood samples uncovered that she had been repeatedly exposed to bromadiolone.

The researchers discovered that bromadiolone is present in blood for a much shorter time than expected. The concentration of bromadiolone is higher in blood plasma than in whole blood, which is important tonote when samplesin different media are interpreted. After storage of the blood samples in the freezer at -20 degrees Celsius, followed by thawing for reanalysis, the concentration of bromadiolone fell over time.

In order to treat bleeding disorders, the cause of the patient’s condition must be identified as soon as possible. When poisoning with blood-thinning substances is suspected, an analysis method that can identify the superwarfarin bromadiolone, plus other superwarfarins and blood-thinning substances, is now available.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Norwegian Institute of Public Health. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Vindenes et al. Bromadiolone Poisoning: LC-MS Method and Pharmacokinetic Data. Journal of Forensic Sciences, 2008; 0 (0): 080509070141841 DOI: 10.1111/j.1556-4029.2008.00737.x

Cite This Page:

Norwegian Institute of Public Health. "New Method Identifies Rat Poison In Humans." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 May 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/05/080527094142.htm>.
Norwegian Institute of Public Health. (2008, May 28). New Method Identifies Rat Poison In Humans. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/05/080527094142.htm
Norwegian Institute of Public Health. "New Method Identifies Rat Poison In Humans." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/05/080527094142.htm (accessed September 17, 2014).

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