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Marine Biologists Investigate Aliens Beneath The Waves

Date:
June 19, 2008
Source:
Queen's University Belfast
Summary:
Marine biologists are appealing for help from the public in looking at ways to detect and stop the spread of marine aliens.

Styela clava, one of the non-native species which has been found in UK waters.
Credit: John Bishop / Marine Biological Association

Queen's University Belfast is appealing for help from the public in looking at ways to detect and stop the spread of marine aliens.

Activities such as aquaculture, shipping and recreational boating have led to an army of marine alien species hitchhiking around the globe. Now Queen's is attempting to find out exactly where and how non-native species get a foothold in a new area. To do this it is asking for help from the public to record what they have seen.

Part of the Marine Aliens consortium, co-ordinated by the Scottish Association for Marine Science, the project will use the information gathered to look at how invasions can be slowed or preferably prevented. It is very difficult to eradicate an organism once it has become established in a new area.

Professor Christine Maggs, from the School of Biological Sciences at Queen's, said: "While exotic plants and animals like rhododendrons and grey squirrels are obvious in the British Isles, beneath the waves a hidden invasion of non-native species is taking place around our shores.

"Many marine aliens have left their natural enemies behind and may compete with native species with potentially disastrous consequences for aquaculture, tourism and other marine activities.

"But we can all do our bit for biosecurity - anyone who has a boat or who visits the shore can help by telling scientists what they have seen."

A guide on the Marine Aliens website will help the public identify some of the non-native species which are least wanted, including the Japanese seaweed Sargassum, which has become extremely common in Strangford Lough, the Chinese mitten crab, already found in Ireland, and two species that have not arrived here yet, the Japanese skeleton shrimp and a colonial sea squirt.

Records of marine life should include as a minimum what was seen, and where and when it was seen. They can be made online at http://www.marlin.ac.uk/rml and sightings in Ireland can also be reported through the invasive species Ireland website http://www.invasivespeciesireland.com


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Queen's University Belfast. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Queen's University Belfast. "Marine Biologists Investigate Aliens Beneath The Waves." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 June 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080616115703.htm>.
Queen's University Belfast. (2008, June 19). Marine Biologists Investigate Aliens Beneath The Waves. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080616115703.htm
Queen's University Belfast. "Marine Biologists Investigate Aliens Beneath The Waves." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080616115703.htm (accessed July 31, 2014).

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