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Loggerhead Turtle Release To Provide Vital Information To Scientific Community

Date:
November 12, 2008
Source:
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science
Summary:
Biologists will release two juvenile loggerhead sea turtles raised in captivity into the Indian River Lagoon near Sebastian Inlet. Dubbed Milton and FeeBee, the turtles were part of a sex ratio study.

Dr. Kirt Rusenko and staff from Gumbo Limbo Nature Center in Boca Raton, Fla. will release "FeeBee' and 'Milton,' two juvenile loggerhead sea turtles raised in captivity, into the Indian River Lagoon near Sebastian Inlet. The pair will be satellite tagged by Dr. Kate Mansfield of the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. Captive-raised turtles are rarely satellite tagged, so this release will give scientists a unique opportunity to see if these turtles behave differently than wild turtles. It will also allow the general public to follow the turtles on their journey in the Atlantic Ocean.
Credit: Gumbo Limbo Nature Center

On Thursday, November 6, 2008, Dr. Kirt Rusenko, Marine Conservationist, and staff from Gumbo Limbo Nature Center in Boca Raton will release two juvenile loggerhead sea turtles raised in captivity into the Indian River Lagoon near Sebastian Inlet.

The loggerheads, dubbed Milton and FeeBee, hatched on Boca Raton's beaches in July 2002 and were part of a sex ratio study conducted by Dr. Jeanette Wyneken of Florida Atlantic University. The gender of sea turtles is determined mostly by the temperature of the sand. Warmer temperatures produce more females, while cooler temperatures produce more males. The study aims to better learn how many males and females are born every year to more successfully determine the health of threatened sea turtle populations. The sex of sea turtles cannot be determined using obvious external characteristics until they are adults.

Milton and FeeBee, along with hundreds of other turtles were raised for 2-3 months until they weighed 4 ounces. Then, their gender was determined by examining internal characteristics using a laparoscope. After the study, Milton (male) and FeeBee (female) were raised at Gumbo Limbo Nature Center and became ambassadors for their species to the thousands of visitors who come to Gumbo Limbo each year. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission requires that once turtles reach a shell length of 18 inches they be released. The turtles, which have reached this size, will be released in the Indian River Lagoon because loggerhead turtles of this size are typically found in this body of water.

The pair of sea turtles will be satellite tagged by Dr. Kate Mansfield of the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. Captive-raised turtles are rarely satellite tagged, so this release will give scientists a unique opportunity to see if these turtles behave differently than wild turtles. It will also allow the general public to follow the paths of Milton and FeeBee on their journey in the Atlantic Ocean through the Gumbo Limbo Nature Center and its site http://www.gumbolimbo.org.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science. "Loggerhead Turtle Release To Provide Vital Information To Scientific Community." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 November 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081103130933.htm>.
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science. (2008, November 12). Loggerhead Turtle Release To Provide Vital Information To Scientific Community. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081103130933.htm
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science. "Loggerhead Turtle Release To Provide Vital Information To Scientific Community." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081103130933.htm (accessed September 22, 2014).

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