Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Women With Mitral Valve Prolapse Are Treated Less Aggressively Than Men And May Be At High Risk

Date:
December 1, 2008
Source:
Mayo Clinic
Summary:
Disturbing evidence of higher mortality and lower surgery rates in women versus men with mitral valve prolapse and severe leakage may be related to the complexity of evaluating the condition's severity in women, according to findings of a new study.

Disturbing evidence of higher mortality and lower surgery rates in women versus men with mitral valve prolapse and severe leakage may be related to the complexity of evaluating the condition's severity in women, according to findings of a Mayo Clinic study published this month in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Related Articles


Mitral valve prolapse affects approximately 150 million people worldwide and often requires cardiac surgery, preferably valve repair rather than replacement, to restore life expectancy of patients with severe leakage, says senior author Maurice Enriquez-Sarano, M.D., a cardiologist at Mayo Clinic. Cardiac valves allow the heart to move blood forward without leakage. Mitral valve prolapse occurs when the leaflets and supporting cords of the mitral valve have excessive tissue and weaken, leading to leakage (regurgitation), he says.

Previous studies on mitral valve disease have examined several sex-based differences, discovering, for example, that mitral valve prolapse is more common in women than men, and that more men than women undergo mitral valve surgery.

This retrospective study examined more than 8,000 patients (4,461 women and 3,768 men) — all patients at Mayo Clinic diagnosed by echocardiography with mitral valve prolapse over 10 years (1989 to 1998).

"This study is significant because it allowed us to look at a large group of patients affected by mitral valve prolapse and examine subtle sex-specific differences that may have been overlooked in the past," Dr. Enriquez-Sarano says. "This study may help physicians manage mitral valve prolapse in women better, more precisely identify women with mitral valve prolapse and severe regurgitation, and treat them — possibly with surgery, which can be lifesaving."

Disturbing differences were observed in men and women with moderate or severe regurgitation — when the mitral valve doesn't close tightly and leaks, with blood flowing backward into the left atrium. The study found that one of the most powerful known reasons to recommend surgery — left ventricular size — was poorly estimated in women because their cardiac size appeared smaller than men, but when their smaller body size was taken into account, cardiac enlargement (a measure of the severity of overload due to regurgitation) was at least as serious, Dr. Enriquez-Sarano says.

Such underestimation of cardiac enlargement may have been the main reason that women with moderate or severe regurgitation were less likely than men to undergo mitral valve surgery. Importantly, this underestimation may have consequences on survival after diagnosis, he says.

In the 15 years following diagnosis, survival rates among women with mitral valve prolapse and no regurgitation were better than men, but odds of survival were worse for women with severe regurgitation, compared with men.

"Physicians who have female patients with mitral valve prolapse and moderate or severe regurgitation must be vigilant. We must consider body size, quantify the leakage as much as possible, and carefully consider valve repair when the regurgitation is severe, so that women, like men, can similarly be offered surgery and its excellent long-term benefit," Dr. Enriquez-Sarano says.

Other Mayo researchers were Jean-Francois Avierinos, M.D.; Jocelyn Inamo, M.D.; Francesco Grigioni, M.D.; Bernard Gersh, M.B.Ch.B., D.Phil.; and Clarence Shub, M.D. Dr. Avierinos is now at Hopital La Timone, France; Dr. Inamo is at Fort-de-France Hospital, France; and Dr. Grigioni is at Ospedale de l'Universita di Bologna, Italy.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Mayo Clinic. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Mayo Clinic. "Women With Mitral Valve Prolapse Are Treated Less Aggressively Than Men And May Be At High Risk." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 December 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081201200217.htm>.
Mayo Clinic. (2008, December 1). Women With Mitral Valve Prolapse Are Treated Less Aggressively Than Men And May Be At High Risk. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 6, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081201200217.htm
Mayo Clinic. "Women With Mitral Valve Prolapse Are Treated Less Aggressively Than Men And May Be At High Risk." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081201200217.htm (accessed March 6, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, March 6, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Bupa Eyes India Healthcare Opportunities

Bupa Eyes India Healthcare Opportunities

Reuters - Business Video Online (Mar. 5, 2015) Bupa is hoping to expand in India&apos;s fast-growing health insurance market, once a rule change on foreign investment is implemented. The British private healthcare group&apos;s CEO tells Grace Pascoe why it&apos;s so keen on the new opportunity. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Liberia Releases Last Ebola Patient, But Threat Remains

Liberia Releases Last Ebola Patient, But Threat Remains

Newsy (Mar. 5, 2015) Liberia&apos;s last Ebola patient has been released, and the country hasn&apos;t recorded a new case in a week. However, fears of another outbreak still exist. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor in Your Pocket Is Getting Smarter

Doctor in Your Pocket Is Getting Smarter

Reuters - Business Video Online (Mar. 5, 2015) Mobile apps are turning smartphones into a personal doctors, with users able to measure heart rate, blood pressure and even blood sugar. But will it change our behaviour? Ivor Bennett reports from the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
AbbVie Inks $21B Deal To Buy Cancer Drugmaker Pharmacyclics

AbbVie Inks $21B Deal To Buy Cancer Drugmaker Pharmacyclics

Newsy (Mar. 5, 2015) AbbVie announced Wednesday it will buy cancer drugmaker Pharmacyclics in a $21 billion deal. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins