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Ecological Impact Of African Cities

Date:
December 13, 2008
Source:
Wiley - Blackwell
Summary:
African cities are growing faster than anywhere else in the world. This is having a major impact, but few ecologists are studying the urban environment and effect of cities on rural areas. One of the most important ecological changes in Africa’s history is being over-looked.

A typical street view in downtown Nairobi, capital of Kenya.
Credit: iStockphoto/Peter Miller

African cities are growing faster than anywhere else in the world. This is having a major impact, but few ecologists are studying the urban environment and effect of cities on rural areas. One of the most important ecological changes in Africa’s history is being over-looked.

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Joy Clancy from the University of Twente has reviewed the problem in the current issue of the African Journal of Ecology. She says “A hundred years ago 95% of the African population was rural, today 38% live in cities with about half the population expected to be urban by 2010.” This rapid growth is resulting in huge changes in natural resource use, but the effects are highly controversial.

“Some environmentalists say that demand for fuel wood and charcoal from cities are causing deforestation, but in fact it is change in land use that is the main driver” continues Joy. “The real change is around cities – the ‘peri-urban’ areas – where woodlands are cleared for agriculture to feed the new centres of population.” She points out “When this is added to the effect on water demand and waste disposal on aquatic ecosystems, then African cities can have an ecological footprint much larger than their actual extent.”

But there is little research on the ecology of cities “Africa is famous for its wildlife and the ecology of places such as the Serengeti are familiar to people all over the world, but remarkably few ecologists are studying urban environments” says Jon Lovett, associate editor of the African Journal of Ecology. “Although we know a lot about lions and wildebeest, the real ecological challenges are in the cities and these are being ignored” he continues. “We need a massive shift in focus to tackle the most urgent environmental issues”.


Joy S. Clancy (2008). Urban ecological footprints in Africa. African Journal of Ecology Vol. 46 Iss 4. DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2028.2008.01041.x

Jon C. Lovett 2008. Urbanisation and over-population. African Journal of Ecology Vol 46 Iss 4. DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2028.2008.01040.x


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wiley - Blackwell. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. Clancy et al. Urban ecological footprints in Africa. African Journal of Ecology, 2008; 46 (4): 463 DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2028.2008.01041.x
  2. Jon C. Lovett et al. Urbanisation and over-population. African Journal of Ecology, Vol 46 Issue 4 DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2028.2008.01040.x

Cite This Page:

Wiley - Blackwell. "Ecological Impact Of African Cities." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 December 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081202081457.htm>.
Wiley - Blackwell. (2008, December 13). Ecological Impact Of African Cities. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081202081457.htm
Wiley - Blackwell. "Ecological Impact Of African Cities." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081202081457.htm (accessed October 24, 2014).

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