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Efficiency Of Blue Organic Light-emitting Diode Boosted By 25%

Date:
March 30, 2009
Source:
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Summary:
Researchers have designed new host materials for a blue phosphorescent OLED that boost efficiency by at least 25 percent and help solve "weakest link" in development of cost-effective white OLEDs.

New, more efficient host materials for the blue phosphorescent OLED (pictured) have been designed, developed and tested by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists. By using new host materials, scientists have been able to improve the efficiency by at least 25 percent and have unlocked doors to developing much more efficient white OLEDs.
Credit: Image courtesy of DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Lighting consumes one-fifth of the electricity generated in the United States. Solid-state lighting offers tremendous potential to improve the situation – once major research challenges are overcome.

The most promising technology is the organic light-emitting diode, or OLED. These multi-layered devices produce light by running an electrical current through a specially engineered host material into which light-producing phosphorescent molecules are embedded or "doped." The white light envisioned for large-scale applications, such as rooms and buildings, consists of red, green and blue light.

"The weakest link in OLED research is the absence of an efficient, long-lasting blue light to accompany the red and green," said Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientist Asanga Padmaperuma. Development of better host materials to manage the flow of electricity through the device could help solve that problem.

Padmaperuma and his collegues have designed, synthesized and tested new materials that improve the power efficiency of blue OLEDs by at least 25 percent.

On Sunday, March 22, PNNL scientists will discuss advancements in blue OLED research in two presentations and a poster session at the spring meeting of the American Chemical Society.

The Department of Energy's solid state lighting program is funding the OLED research.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. "Efficiency Of Blue Organic Light-emitting Diode Boosted By 25%." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 March 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090322154424.htm>.
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. (2009, March 30). Efficiency Of Blue Organic Light-emitting Diode Boosted By 25%. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090322154424.htm
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. "Efficiency Of Blue Organic Light-emitting Diode Boosted By 25%." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090322154424.htm (accessed October 20, 2014).

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