Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Injured Marines At Risk For Abnormal Bone Growth

Date:
May 4, 2009
Source:
American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
Summary:
Marines and other military personnel who are wounded in combat as the result of a high-energy trauma, such as a bomb blast, are likely to develop an abnormality known as heterotopic ossification. In this condition, bone forms within the soft tissues, such as muscle located near a fracture or other bone injury.

Marines and other military personnel who are wounded in combat as the result of a high-energy trauma, such as a bomb blast, are likely to develop an abnormality known as heterotopic ossification. In this condition, bone forms within the soft tissues, such as muscle located near a fracture or other bone injury. New research conducted at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, MD, is helping to pave the way for a better understanding of the mechanisms of the condition, and better courses of prevention and treatment.

A discussion of the study appears in the May 2009 issue of The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery.

"The purposes of this study were to report our experiences with high-energy wartime extremity wounds, to define the prevalence of heterotopic ossification in these patients, and to determine the factors that might lead to development of the condition," said lead author Lieutenant Commander Jonathan Agner Forsberg, MD.

Dr. Forsberg and his team compared data from 243 patients who were treated for orthopaedic injuries between March 1, 2003 and December 31, 2006 at the medical center, including patients who underwent:

  • amputation
  • external or internal fixation of one or more fractures
  • removal of damaged, dead or infected tissue, or 'debridement'

The researchers considered variables such as:

  • age and gender of the patient
  • location and mechanism of injury
  • location of the heterotopic ossification
  • presence and severity of brain injury

The team also compared patients' Injury Severity Scores, which are values assessed to individual patients based on the number and types of injuries they have sustained.

The study determined risk factors for the development of this condition which include:

  • an age of less than 30 years
  • the presence and severity of traumatic brain injury
  • the presence of an amputation
  • multiple injuries to the extremities
  • a high Injury Severity Score

Heterotopic ossification is often associated with injuries to the brain or spinal cord, which can cause the entire body to react as though it is under attack. This type of response is known as a systemic inflammatory response. Dr. Forsberg believes this unique response to massive injury is the key to understanding why the abnormal bone growth occurs more often in military wounds than in those commonly treated in the civilian population.

"Systemic inflammation is detrimental to this patient population," Dr. Forsberg noted. "We believe that this sort of response contributes significantly to the development of heterotopic ossification, and is the reason why the condition is more prevalent in the war-wounded population."

Dr. Forsberg also said further study to be conducted at the medical center will focus heavily on treatment methods geared toward prevention of the condition.

"Once we develop a better understanding of the events that cause heterotopic ossification, one of our primary recommendations will be treatments to prevent the condition from occurring," noted Dr. Forsberg.

Disclosure: In support of their research for or preparation of his work, one or more of the authors received, in any one year, outside funding or grants of less than $10,000 from the U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine Advanced Development Program. Neither they nor a member of their immediate families received payments or other benefits or a commitment or agreement to provide such benefits from a commercial entity. No commercial entity paid or directed, or agreed to pay or direct, any benefits to any research fund, foundation, division, center, clinical practice, or other charitable or nonprofit organization with which the authors, or a member of their immediate families, are affiliated or associated.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. "Injured Marines At Risk For Abnormal Bone Growth." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 May 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090501091020.htm>.
American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. (2009, May 4). Injured Marines At Risk For Abnormal Bone Growth. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 16, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090501091020.htm
American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. "Injured Marines At Risk For Abnormal Bone Growth." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090501091020.htm (accessed April 16, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Could Even Casual Marijuana Use Alter Your Brain?

Could Even Casual Marijuana Use Alter Your Brain?

Newsy (Apr. 16, 2014) A new study conducted by researchers at Northwestern and Harvard suggests even casual marijuana use can alter your brain. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Formerly Conjoined Twins Released From Dallas Hospital

Formerly Conjoined Twins Released From Dallas Hospital

Newsy (Apr. 16, 2014) Conjoined twins Emmett and Owen Ezell were separated by doctors in August. Now, nearly nine months later, they're being released from the hospital. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Outbreak Now Linked To 121 Deaths

Ebola Outbreak Now Linked To 121 Deaths

Newsy (Apr. 15, 2014) The ebola virus outbreak in West Africa is now linked to 121 deaths. Health officials fear the virus will continue to spread in urban areas. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Cognitive Function: Is It All Downhill From Age 24?

Cognitive Function: Is It All Downhill From Age 24?

Newsy (Apr. 15, 2014) A new study out of Canada says cognitive motor performance begins deteriorating around age 24. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins