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New Light Shed On Enigma Of Salt Intake And Hypertension

Date:
May 5, 2009
Source:
Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres
Summary:
High salt intake is generally linked to cardiovascular disease risk. But salt-sensitive hypertension still remains an enigma. Now, investigators have shed new light on the relationship between salt intake, bodily processes, and blood pressure regulation. Within the skin, they have detected a new storage area for salt in the body. If the process behind this storage is defect, animals become hypertensive.

High salt intake is generally linked to cardiovascular disease risk. But salt-sensitive hypertension still remains an enigma. Now, investigators from Germany at the University of Erlangen, the Max Delbrόck Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) Berlin-Buch and Regensburg, collaborating with researchers from Finland and Austria have shed new light on the relationship between salt intake, bodily processes, and blood pressure regulation. Within the skin, they have detected a new storage area for salt in the body.

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They also found out that if the process behind this storage is defect, animals become hypertensive.

Salt (sodium chloride, NaCl) is required for life. Herbivores (plant-eating animals) risk their lives to go to "salt licks" and carnivores (meat-eating animals) go to salt licks to eat herbivores in order to obtain salt.

Salt is responsible for water regulation in the body. It is taken up by the gastro-intestinal (GI) tract and, in large part, excreted by the kidneys. However, salt is also stored in cells and in the interstitium, the area between cells in the body.

Dr. Jens Titze and colleages, among them Dominik N. Mόller, Wolfgang Derer, and Friedrich C. Luft from the Experimental and Clinical Research Center at the MDC, could now show that a high-salt diet in rats leads to the accumulation of salt in the interstitium in the skin. This process is carefully regulated by special white blood cells, the macrophages.

In those macrophages, the scientists found a gene regulator (transcription factor) called TonEBP (tonicity-responsible enhancer binding protein). TonEBP is activated in these cells in response to high salt and turns on a gene (VEGF-C - vascular endothelial growth factor C) that controls the production of lymphatic blood vessels. With high-salt diet the lymphatic vessels increase.

The investigators also showed that when these macrophages are depleted or if the receptor for VEGF-C is absent, the animals are not able to "store their salt" and become hypertensive. However, this process and its relevance to human disease are not yet completely understood..


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Machnik et al. Macrophages regulate salt-dependent volume and blood pressure by a vascular endothelial growth factor-C–dependent buffering mechanism. Nature Medicine, 2009; DOI: 10.1038/nm.1960

Cite This Page:

Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres. "New Light Shed On Enigma Of Salt Intake And Hypertension." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 May 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090504094428.htm>.
Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres. (2009, May 5). New Light Shed On Enigma Of Salt Intake And Hypertension. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090504094428.htm
Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres. "New Light Shed On Enigma Of Salt Intake And Hypertension." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090504094428.htm (accessed November 24, 2014).

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