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Bird Flu Virus Remains Infectious Up To 600 Days In Municipal Landfills

Date:
June 3, 2009
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
Amid concerns about a pandemic of swine flu, researchers report for the first time that poultry carcasses infected with another threat -- the "bird flu" virus -- can remain infectious in municipal landfills for almost 2 years. 

Amid concerns about a pandemic of swine flu, researchers from Nebraska report for the first time that poultry carcasses infected with another threat — the "bird flu" virus — can remain infectious in municipal landfills for almost 2 years. 

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Shannon L. Bartelt-Hunt and colleagues note that avian influenza, specifically the H5N1 strain, is an ongoing public health concern. Hundreds of millions of chickens and ducks infected with the virus have died or been culled from flocks worldwide in efforts to control the disease. More than 4 million poultry died or were culled in a 2002 outbreak in Virginia, and the carcasses were disposed of in municipal landfills. Until now, few studies have directly assessed the safety of landfill disposal.

"The objectives of this study were to assess the survival of avian influenza in landfill leachate and the influence of environmental factors," says the report. The data showed that the virus survived in landfill leachate — liquid that drains or "leaches" from a landfill — for at least 30 days and up to 600 days. The two factors that most reduced influenza survival times were elevated temperature and acidic or alkaline pH. "Data obtained from this study indicate that landfilling is an appropriate method for disposal of carcasses infected with avian influenza," says the study, noting that landfills are designed to hold material for much longer periods of time.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Graiver et al. Survival of the Avian Influenza Virus (H6N2) After Land Disposal. Environmental Science & Technology, 2009; 43 (11): 4063 DOI: 10.1021/es900370x

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Bird Flu Virus Remains Infectious Up To 600 Days In Municipal Landfills." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 June 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090601110251.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2009, June 3). Bird Flu Virus Remains Infectious Up To 600 Days In Municipal Landfills. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 27, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090601110251.htm
American Chemical Society. "Bird Flu Virus Remains Infectious Up To 600 Days In Municipal Landfills." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090601110251.htm (accessed March 27, 2015).

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