Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Discovery Of New Proteins May Lead To More Effective Treatment Of Endocarditis And Infections Associated With Implants

Date:
June 9, 2009
Source:
The Swedish Research Council
Summary:
Scientists have discovered two new proteins that are of importance to the survival of bacteria and their colonization of the human body. Besides enhancing our knowledge of the ability of bacteria to spread, the findings may also lead to more effective treatment of endocarditis and infections associated with implants.

A research team at the Faculty of Odontology at Malmφ University in Sweden has discovered two new proteins that are of importance to the survival of bacteria and their colonization of the human body. Besides enhancing our knowledge of the ability of bacteria to spread, the findings may also lead to more effective treatment of endocarditis and infections associated with implants.

Each year some 500 people in Sweden develop endocarditis, inflammation of the heart valves. The condition can be life-threatening, and one of the bacteria that cause the disease is Streptococcus gordonii, a bacterium that exists in the mouth.

"It's part of the natural flora of bacteria there, but sometimes it gets into the bloodstream, and then it can lead to infective endocarditis. The bacteria have also been found in infections surrounding various kinds of implants," says Associate Professor Julia Davies, who directed the research team at the Faculty of Odontology.

To survive in the oral cavity the bacteria must be able to attach to a surface, such as the mucous membrane. This is done with the help of proteins. In the mid 1990s one of these proteins from the bacterium S. gordonii was identified by a research team in England.

Julia Davies and her colleagues have now discovered two more. These scientists have thereby taken a step toward an understanding of how these bacteria get a grip on a surface, on heart valves, for instance. The two new proteins, SGO 0707 and SGO 1487, are found in the cell wall of the bacterium S. gordonii. The proteins are produced by the bacterium, and without them the bacterium cannot fasten to a surface, which is a precondition for it to be able to survive.

If bacteria wind up in the bloodstream, they can bind to the heart valves, where they produce a so-called biofilm and encapsulate themselves. Once the bacteria are encapsulated, it is extremely difficult to get rid of them. But with enhanced knowledge of how bacteria fasten to surfaces, it will be easier to find effective new strategies to treat biofilms-induced diseases.

"If we can block this binding with the help of drugs, treatment will be more effective," says Julia Davies.

It was previously known that bacteria that grow in so-called biofilms alter their properties when they settle on a surface. For example, they become more resistant to antibiotics and antibacterial compounds.

These researchers are now moving on to find out how this resistance arises.

"We want to understand in what ways bacteria alter their properties when they settle on a surface," says Julia Davies.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by The Swedish Research Council. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

The Swedish Research Council. "Discovery Of New Proteins May Lead To More Effective Treatment Of Endocarditis And Infections Associated With Implants." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 June 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090604104809.htm>.
The Swedish Research Council. (2009, June 9). Discovery Of New Proteins May Lead To More Effective Treatment Of Endocarditis And Infections Associated With Implants. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090604104809.htm
The Swedish Research Council. "Discovery Of New Proteins May Lead To More Effective Treatment Of Endocarditis And Infections Associated With Implants." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090604104809.htm (accessed August 27, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Predicting Heart Transplant Rejection With a Blood Test

Predicting Heart Transplant Rejection With a Blood Test

Ivanhoe (Aug. 27, 2014) — Now a new approach to rejection of donor organs could change the way doctors predict transplant rejection…without expensive, invasive procedures. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Better Braces That Vibrate

Better Braces That Vibrate

Ivanhoe (Aug. 27, 2014) — The length of time you have to keep your braces on could be cut in half thanks to a new device that speeds up the process. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Smartphone App Tracks Your Heart Rate

Smartphone App Tracks Your Heart Rate

Ivanhoe (Aug. 27, 2014) — A new app that can track your heart rate 24/7 is available for download in your app store and its convenience could save your life. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Stroke in Young Adults

Stroke in Young Adults

Ivanhoe (Aug. 27, 2014) — A stroke can happen at any time and affect anyone regardless of age. This mother chose to give her son independence and continue to live a normal life after he had a stroke at 18 years old. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins