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Newly Discovered Chemical Weapon In Poison Frogs' Arsenal

Date:
June 9, 2009
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
New research documents a surprising chemical weapon used by some Amazonian poison frogs. The study identified for the first time a family of poisons never before known to exist in these brightly colored creatures or elsewhere in nature: the N-methyldecahydroquinolines. The authors then speculated on its origin in the frogs' diet, most likely ants.

Scientists have discovered new toxins that some Amazonian poison frogs use as a chemical defense against predators.
Credit: The American Chemical Society

New research documents a surprising chemical weapon used by some Amazonian poison frogs. The study identified for the first time a family of poisons never before known to exist in these brightly colored creatures or elsewhere in nature: the N-methyldecahydroquinolines. The authors then speculated on its origin in the frogs' diet, most likely ants.

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H. Martin Garraffo and colleagues note there are more than 500 alkaloids, potentially toxic substances, known to exist in the skin of poison frogs of the family Dendrobatidae. Frogs use them as a chemical defense to discourage predators from biting and eating them. Western Colombian natives have used skin extracts from another group of frogs, unrelated to those in the new study, to coat blow-darts for hunting.

Frogs get nearly all of the alkaloids from their diet, removing alkaloids from ants, mites, small beetles, millipedes and possibly other small arthropods, concentrating them with incredible efficiency, and storing them in their skin. However, Garraffo's group was not certain about the origin of the newly discovered N-methyldecahydroquinolines, which could also be produced in the frogs' own bodies. Feeding experiments with alkaloids fed to captive frogs are planned, which might settle this point.

The scientists analyzed alkaloids from the skin of 13 of the more than 25 species of the genus Ameerega of poison frogs. They identified the new toxins in the frogs as being of the N-methyldecahydroquinoline class, which were present among several other alkaloids.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Daly et al. N-Methyldecahydroquinolines: An Unexpected Class of Alkaloids from Amazonian Poison Frogs (Dendrobatidae). Journal of Natural Products, 2009; 090511093706043 DOI: 10.1021/np900094v

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Newly Discovered Chemical Weapon In Poison Frogs' Arsenal." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 June 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090608101334.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2009, June 9). Newly Discovered Chemical Weapon In Poison Frogs' Arsenal. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 20, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090608101334.htm
American Chemical Society. "Newly Discovered Chemical Weapon In Poison Frogs' Arsenal." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090608101334.htm (accessed April 20, 2015).

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