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Controlling Kudzu With Naturally Occurring Fungus

Date:
July 20, 2009
Source:
USDA/Agricultural Research Service
Summary:
Kudzu, "The Vine that Ate the South," could meet its match in a naturally occurring fungus that scientists have formulated as a biologically based herbicide.

Kudzu, which spreads at the rate of 150,000 acres annually, could meet its match in a naturally occurring fungus that ARS scientists have formulated as a biologically based herbicide.
Credit: Photo by Peggy Greb

Kudzu, "The Vine that Ate the South," could meet its match in a naturally occurring fungus that Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists have formulated as a biologically based herbicide.

By one estimate, kudzu spreads at the rate of 150,000 acres annually, easily outpacing the use of herbicide spraying and mowing, as well increasing the costs of these controls by $6 million annually.

But in Stoneville, Miss., ARS plant pathologist Doug Boyette and colleagues are testing a fungus named Myrothecium verrucaria, which infects kudzu with an astonishing speed of its own. In fact, the fungus works so quickly that kudzu plants sprayed with it in the morning start showing signs of damage by mid-afternoon, according to Boyette, with the ARS Southern Weed Science Research Unit in Stoneville.

He first began working with M. verrucaria in 1998, when a Louisiana Tech University scientist furnished him with isolates from diseased sicklepod specimens. In greenhouse experiments, spray formulations killed 100 percent of kudzu seedlings and 90 to 100 percent of older plants in outdoor trials. Myrothecium also worked its anti-kudzu magic under a wide range of conditions, including the absence of dew.

Additionally, host-range tests in 2005 showed that Myrothecium caused little or no injury to many of the woody plants known to occur in kudzu-infested habitats, including oak, cedar, pine, hickory, pecan, sassafras and blackberry.

A few companies expressed interest, but only if the fungus' production of toxins called trichothecenes could be reduced or stopped. Boyette's group examined several approaches, settling on a method of growing Myrothecium in a fermenter on a liquid diet instead of a solid one. Not only did this stop trichothecene production or reduce it to acceptable levels, the method also extended the fungus' shelf life and potency under field conditions.

Besides kudzu, Myrothecium also showed potential as a pre-emergence bioherbicide, controlling purslane and spurge in transplanted tomatoes.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by USDA/Agricultural Research Service. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

USDA/Agricultural Research Service. "Controlling Kudzu With Naturally Occurring Fungus." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 July 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/07/090719185107.htm>.
USDA/Agricultural Research Service. (2009, July 20). Controlling Kudzu With Naturally Occurring Fungus. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/07/090719185107.htm
USDA/Agricultural Research Service. "Controlling Kudzu With Naturally Occurring Fungus." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/07/090719185107.htm (accessed July 31, 2014).

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