Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Hepatitis C Virus Carriers Experience Substantial Increase In Mortality

Date:
July 30, 2009
Source:
Wiley-Blackwell
Summary:
Hepatitis C virus is a blood-borne disease that causes inflammation of the liver and to which there is currently no vaccine available. The World Health Organization estimates that 3 percent of the world's population, approximately 170 million people, are infected with HCV and it is a leading cause of liver cirrhosis, end stage liver disease, hepatocellular carcinoma and liver transplantation.

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a blood-borne disease that causes inflammation of the liver and to which there is currently no vaccine available. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that 3% of the world’s population, approximately 170 million people, are infected with HCV and it is a leading cause of liver cirrhosis, end stage liver disease, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and liver transplantation.

Researchers at Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences concluded a 10-year study in Japan (where there is a greater incidence of HCV) and found the overall mortality rate was higher in HCV carriers. A second study, led by Dr. Adeel Butt from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, looked at the effect of HCV on survival rate and also confirmed individuals infected with HCV had much higher death rates. Both findings appear in the August issue of Hepatology, a journal published by John Wiley & Sons on behalf of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

The Kagoshima research team, led by Hirofumi Uto, studied 1,125 individuals with the HCV antibody from 1995 through the end of 2005 or to their earlier death. Of the total, 758 (67.4%) had detectable HCV core antigen (HCVcAg) or HCV Ribonucleic Acid (HCV RNA) and were classified as carriers meaning the patients were viremic. The 367 (32.6%) individuals who had a prior HCV infection, but tested negative for both HCVcAg and HCV RNA were considered non-carriers or non-viremic.

According to the study, a total of 231 deaths occurred in the subjects over an average of 8.2 years of follow-up with 176 deaths in the HCV carrier group and 55 of the non-carriers. Using death certificates, researchers classified the deaths into 7 categories: hepatocellular carcinoma, liver disease (excluding HCC), neoplasms (excluding HCC), stroke, heart disease, pulmonary disease (excluding lung cancer) and unknown/other causes.

“Adjusting for age and gender,” researchers concluded, “the elevated mortality rate among the subjects with HCV viremia was due to a much higher occurrence of liver-related deaths, but was not significantly associated with death from other malignancies such as stroke, heart disease, or pulmonary disease.” The study notes that the higher overall mortality rate is explained by the higher rate of liver-related deaths from HCC and non-HCC with a cumulative risk of death of 28.0% for carriers, compared to 17.8% for non-carriers (based on Kaplan-Meier estimates).

Additionally, researchers observed that high HCVcAg levels were predictive of liver-related deaths, including HCC, in the HCV carriers. “Monitoring HCV load and ALT level in HCV carriers may be important for identifying those individuals at increased risk for HCC or other liver disease, particularly among older carriers who are less likely to respond to HCV treatment,” said the authors.

Dr. Butt’s team studied a national sample of 34,480 HCV infected subjects versus a non-infected control of the same number from the Electronically Retrieved Cohort of HCV Infected Veterans (ERCHIVES) and found that those infected were more likely to have a shortened survival rate. “HCV increased the risk of death by about 37% after adjusting for demographic characteristics and common comorbidities.” Treatment for HCV was associated with a significant decrease in mortality. Individuals who received at least 48 weeks of treatment had the lowest mortality, while those who received less than 48 weeks of treatment had intermediate mortality compared with untreated individuals. “Strategies to identify appropriate candidates for treatment, and to ensure completion of treatment may substantially reduce mortality in HCV infected persons,” concluded the authors.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wiley-Blackwell. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. Hirofumi Uto, Sherri Stuver, Katsuhiro Hayashi, Kotaro Kumagai, Fumisato Sasaki, Shuji Kanmura, Masatsugu Numata, Akihiro Moriuchi, Susumu Hasegawa, Makoto Oketani, Akio Ido, Kazunori Kusumoto, Satoru Hasuike, Kenji Nagata, Michinori Kohara, Hirohito Tsubouchi. Mortality in HCV carriers in Japan. Hepatology, August 2009 DOI: 10.1002/hep.23002
  2. Adeel Butt, Xiaoqiang Wang, Charity Moore. Effect of HCV and Its Treatment upon Survival. Hepatology, August 2009 DOI: 10.1002/hep.23000
  3. Kenny-Walsh et al. Increased liver-related mortality to hepatitis C viremia defined on the 20th anniversary of its identification. Hepatology, 2009; 50 (2): 349 DOI: 10.1002/hep.23107

Cite This Page:

Wiley-Blackwell. "Hepatitis C Virus Carriers Experience Substantial Increase In Mortality." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 July 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/07/090730111154.htm>.
Wiley-Blackwell. (2009, July 30). Hepatitis C Virus Carriers Experience Substantial Increase In Mortality. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/07/090730111154.htm
Wiley-Blackwell. "Hepatitis C Virus Carriers Experience Substantial Increase In Mortality." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/07/090730111154.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Snack Attack: Study Says Action Movies Make You Snack More

Snack Attack: Study Says Action Movies Make You Snack More

Newsy (Sep. 2, 2014) You're more likely to gain weight while watching action flicks than you are watching other types of programming, says a new study published in JAMA. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
U.N. Says Ebola Travel Restrictions Will Cause Food Shortage

U.N. Says Ebola Travel Restrictions Will Cause Food Shortage

Newsy (Sep. 2, 2014) The U.N. says the problem is two-fold — quarantine zones and travel restrictions are limiting the movement of both people and food. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctors Fear They're Losing Battle Against Ebola

Doctors Fear They're Losing Battle Against Ebola

AP (Sep. 2, 2014) As a third American missionary is confirmed to have contracted Ebola in Liberia, doctors on the ground in West Africa fear they're losing the battle against the outbreak. (Sept. 2) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Tech Giants Bet on 3D Headsets for Gaming, Healthcare

Tech Giants Bet on 3D Headsets for Gaming, Healthcare

AFP (Sep. 2, 2014) When Facebook acquired the virtual reality hardware developer Oculus VR in March for $2 billion, CEO Mark Zuckerberg hailed the firm's technology as "a new communication platform." Duration: 02:24 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins