Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

HIV Integrase Inhibitor Effective For Patients Beginning Antiretroviral Treatment, Study Suggests

Date:
August 20, 2009
Source:
Emory University
Summary:
A member of a new class of antiretroviral drugs is safe and effective for patients beginning treatment against HIV, according to researchers who have completed a two-year multisite phase III clinical trial comparing it with standard antiretroviral drugs.

A member of a new class of antiretroviral drugs is safe and effective for patients beginning treatment against HIV, according to researchers who have completed a two-year multisite phase III clinical trial comparing it with standard antiretroviral drugs.

Related Articles


The results are online and scheduled for publication in an upcoming issue of the Lancet.

Lead author of the Lancet article is Jeffrey Lennox, MD, professor of medicine (infectious diseases) at Emory University School of Medicine. Lennox is chief of Emory's HIV/AIDS clinical trials unit and vice-chair of medicine dealing with Grady Memorial Hospital.

"These results provide an additional potent, well tolerated treatment option for newly diagnosed patients with HIV infection," says Lennox.

Raltegravir, a HIV integrase inhibitor, is overall as effective as widely used efavirenz, a reverse transcriptase inhibitor, the researchers found. Raltegravir also had faster onset of action and fewer adverse side effects. In the clinical trial, both were combined with two other standard retroviral drugs, tenofovir and emtricitabine.

The trial included 566 patients from 67 medical centers on five continents. The "primary endpoint" of the trial was pushing viral levels below 50 copies per ml of blood by week 48. Of the raltegravir group, 86 percent reached that goal, compared with 82 percent of the efavirenz group.

Half the raltegravir group reached the endpoint by week four, compared with less than 20 percent for the efavirenz group. In addition, the raltegravir group encountered fewer side effects such as headache, dizziness and elevation in levels of cholesterol.

Raltegravir inhibits the HIV integrase enzyme, which inserts the viral genome into the host cell's DNA. It was the first integrase inhibitor to be approved by the FDA. Other types of antiretroviral drugs inhibit HIV's protease or reverse transcriptase enzymes.

Guidelines from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services currently recommend efavirenz or a protease inhibitor, in combination with tenofovir and emtricitabine, as a preferred drug regimen for adults beginning antiretroviral treatment.

Efavirenz, tenofovir and emtricitabine make up a once-a-day combination (Atripla) approved by the FDA in 2006. The authors note that raltegravir is usually taken twice a day, which may be more difficult for some patients. However, raltegravir's reduction in side effects and concerns about the ability of efavirenz to cause birth defects may be advantages for raltegravir, the authors say.

Raltetravir was approved by the FDA in 2007, but at first only for people infected with HIV that is resistant to other drugs. The results of this study contributed to the July 2009 decision by the FDA to expand the indication for raltegravir beyond only individuals infected with HIV that is resistant to other drugs.

The study was funded by Merck, which produces raltegravir, known commercially as Isentress. Lennox has been a paid consultant for Merck.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Emory University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Emory University. "HIV Integrase Inhibitor Effective For Patients Beginning Antiretroviral Treatment, Study Suggests." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 August 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090802193917.htm>.
Emory University. (2009, August 20). HIV Integrase Inhibitor Effective For Patients Beginning Antiretroviral Treatment, Study Suggests. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090802193917.htm
Emory University. "HIV Integrase Inhibitor Effective For Patients Beginning Antiretroviral Treatment, Study Suggests." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090802193917.htm (accessed November 27, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, November 27, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) Researchers in the United States are preparing to discover whether a drug commonly used in human organ transplants can extend the lifespan and health quality of pet dogs. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Newsy (Nov. 26, 2014) Advances in prosthetics are making replacement body parts stronger and more lifelike than they’ve ever been. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) The US FDA is announcing new calorie rules on Tuesday that will require everywhere from theaters to vending machines to include calorie counts. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) Need another reason to eat yogurt every day? Researchers now say it could reduce a person's risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins