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Intelligent Crutch With Sensors To Monitor Usage

Date:
September 12, 2009
Source:
University of Southampton
Summary:
A forearm crutch which incorporates sensor technology to monitor whether it is being used correctly has been developed by engineers.

Diagram of crutch.
Credit: Image courtesy of University of Southampton

A forearm crutch which incorporates sensor technology to monitor whether it is being used correctly has been developed by engineers at the University of Southampton.

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The crutch, which was developed by Professor Neil White and Dr Geoff Merrett at the University's School of Electronics and Computer Science in conjunction with Georgina Hallett, a physiotherapist at Southampton General Hospital, is fitted with three accelerometers that detect movement and force sensors that measure the weight being applied to a patient's leg and the position of his/her hand on the grip.

Data are transmitted wirelessly to a remote computer and visual information is displayed on the crutch if the patient uses it incorrectly.

'A growing number of people are in need of physiotherapy,’ said Professor White, ‘but reports from physiotherapists indicate that people do not always use crutches in the correct manner. Until now, there has been no way to monitor this, even though repeated incorrect use of the crutch could make the patient's injury worse.’

The new crutch has been developed using low-cost, off-the-shelf technology and sensors similar to those used in Nintendo Wii.

‘These crutches will make it much easier for patients to be taught how to use them properly, and how much weight they are allowed to put through their injured leg,’ said Georgina Hallett. ‘This will help them to get out of hospital faster and also reduce their risk of further damaging an already injured leg by putting too much or too little weight through it.’

At the moment, the crutch is suitable for monitoring and training patients in hospital environments; the researchers have plans to develop a pair for use in patients' homes.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Southampton. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Southampton. "Intelligent Crutch With Sensors To Monitor Usage." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 September 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090805075642.htm>.
University of Southampton. (2009, September 12). Intelligent Crutch With Sensors To Monitor Usage. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090805075642.htm
University of Southampton. "Intelligent Crutch With Sensors To Monitor Usage." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090805075642.htm (accessed November 29, 2014).

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